Username:
Password:

User login

Shooting with a Different Perspective

A Mike Larson Tutorial

4.142855
Your rating: None Average: 4.1 (7 votes)

Summary

In this “How To” tutorial, photographer Mike Larson gives us tips on the specifics of shooting in different perspectives to make the best possible outcome to make the model look most appealing.

This time Larson has chosen a boat as his location while uses a tilt shift lens to isolate specific parts of the model and the surrounding atmosphere. Larson gives a helpful and accurate account of all technical aspects used so photographers can recreate a professional shooting in their own environment. Key once again is Larson's perfect direction of the models to ensure the best possible outcome. What is of particular note is the usage of composition and framing and flexibility when it comes to changing perspectives. Such simple things available on location such as doorframes and nearby objects enhance the shoot immensely. Larson continues to use sun bouncers to give the most dynamic light available producing spectacular professional resultsPaying close attention to light and their results is key to Larson's approach, while shooting on one location getting four or five different looks.

To get updates on Mike Larson's work and tips, visit his twitter page at mikelarsoninc.

Comments

I enjoy it

It is always exciting to see how this guy is working. Best regards Michael

grand tutorial how to use a tight location, t/s lens, light...

...this is a very good tutorial how to use a tilt + shift lens for portraits/weddings. The limited location for the model is used to its utmost to get a perfect framing without looking constrictive. I like Mike's way to explain, what he is doing and why. Also the little hints about how to make your models feel good and how to make them smile... The use of the sunreflector gives a lot to the final image, so I guess I have to have an assistant for the next shooting... :-) grand tutorial, enjoyed watching it and look forward to use what I've seen in my own work. Thanks. Best, Ernst