Username:
Password:

User login

User Profile Fields Own View

W.M. Hunt

1507-hunt-teaser-gr.jpg
Runtime - length of the film: 16m03s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:


Summary:

Photography collector W.M. Hunt tells how he got into collecting and how his enthusiasm increased over time. He desribes the inception of his archive up to a key moment, when he considered his collection to be complete.

Remarkable is his affinity to pictures that include concealed faces.

Robert Lebeck 5

690_e_lebeck_teaser_gross.jpg
Runtime - length of the film: 9m21s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

In this further installment on the great photojournalist Robert Lebeck, Lebeck will cover his passion for collecting post cards and photographs.

Lebeck began collecting photographs at a time when collecting photos was not seen in context with art or business. Mostly at that time photos were bought or traded at flea markets. And that is exactly what Lebeck did, he dug through thousands of photographs and with his salary growing as his career moved on he was able to make bigger purchases from places like the London Auction. He began collecting 19th century photography because he found it to be very unique. He also chose early photography because it fascinated him because he never formally learned photography he was therefore interested in the early years of photography.

What did Lebeck do when he collected everything he could collect on a specific topic? He went on to collect new things. Much can be said of his private life as well since he remarried every 12 years or so, one could say he
collected wives, but probably his travel and constant dispatching to far away places on assignments led Lebeck to remarry so often.

Philippe Jacquier

e-227-teaser_gross.jpg
Runtime - length of the film: 16m42s
Language: french with english subtitles
Skill level:
Related films:


Summary:

Philippe Jacquier and his wife Marion specialize in Photographs from the 19th and early 20th century, mostly from anonymous, amateur photographers. The great grandson of Gabriel Veyre, one of the pioneers of Autochrome photography, Jacquier credits his great grandfather for his initial interest in vintage photography. He also describes himself as a purveyor and not a collector as he and his wife sell images, with a price tag averaging between EURO 500-2000. Jacquier describes his methods for searching for and selecting the perfect vintage image, most importantly the image must have a special “aura”, magical photo of beautiful movement and composition. One example that is shown during the film is a momentous photo of a horse and his trainer taken sometime in the 1870’s, this photo clearly fills all the criteria Jacquier and his wife find important when selecting images. They find most of their images from private family photo albums, not necessarily on the open market. Their search begins sometimes in the early dark hours, sometimes starting at 5 a.m. Once a year Jacquier and his wife showcase their discoveries at the Paris photo Fair. For Jacquiers’ it was a simple transition: they decided to share their personal tastes in vintage photography paving the way to follow their exciting passion and have fun while making money at the same time, providing collectors with truly unique photos that are definitely one of a kind.

E. O. Hoppé

552-a-hoppeTeaser-gr.jpg
Runtime - length of the film: 15m2s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:

A Big One

Summary:

In this film, photo-curator Graham Howe tells FotoTV a wonderfully interesting story about renowned photographer E.O. Hoppé, and how by chance Howe discovered the stored archives of Hoppé's brilliant work. Howe's story begins in London in 1972, where he met photo-historian Bill Jay. Jay had recently completed and oral history project on E.O. Hoppé, and names Hoppé “The most famous photographer in the world, in 1920.” Howe was surprised, because as an art student, he knew photographers such as, Stieglitz, Steichen, and Strand to be the famous photographers of the 1920s. Although ignited with curiosity, Howe would not learn more about Hoppé until a chance meeting twenty years later with Michael Hoppé, E.O. Hoppé’s grandson. That meeting provided him with further contacts, which led him to a London stock agency, where a large amount of Hoppé’s photographic work was archived. Amongst the exquisite work, Howe found an incredibly rare photograph of 42nd St. in New York City, dated 1921 and signed by E.O. Hoppé. It was on this day of discovery that Howe realized, it was the American photographers who were noted as being the best modernists of that era, but actually there was also Hoppé, a European who was just as good if not better than the master photographers the world up until this point knew of. Howe spent another ten years, locating and researching the archives of E.O. Hoppé, a total of about 100,000 images. An incredible amount of time was spent organizing, cataloging, and reassembling the images. It was now clear to Howe why Hoppé went unaccredited as one of the most important modernists of the blue chip era of photography for so long, because Hoppé sold his entire archive to a stock agency in 1952. The agency did not syndicate his work, thus making his work unavailable and largely unknown on the market for many years, including the years where his contemporaries received accolades for their work of the 1920s. Howe is currently working on a collection of 12 photo-books, with themes of portraiture, landscape, and dance, of Hoppé’s work. In addition, upcoming Hoppé exhibitions are, “The German Work: 1925-1938”, at the Berlinische Gallerie in Berlin, Germany, November 2010, and “The English: 1912-1950”, at the National Portrait Gallery in London, in March 2011

Civil War

485-civil-war-teaser-gr.jpg
Runtime - length of the film: 21m12s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:



Summary:

In this film curator and photographer, Michael Ebert shows us select images from the outstanding Civil War Photographs Collection, which he meticulously digitally restored to their original quality. During the challenging restoration process, Ebert reveals to FotoTV the previously unknown details he discovered about the everyday life of the people who lived and worked around, or fought in the American Civil War more than 150 years ago. To arrive at the best results possible, he used a Wacom Cintiq 21UX with interactive pen display, one of the industry’s most intuitive image editing tools. “The Civil War was the world’s first major event to be documented in photographs, which makes the database of images a genuine treasure trove”, Ebert tells FotoTV. “In addition, the so-called collodion process -a flammable syrupy solution- was used at this time. This was a complicated process that posed great challenges for photographers at that time. It produced photographs of a very high level of technical quality on plates, allowing a high degree of enlargement. Nonetheless, over the years, many of the plates were broken or damaged. For the project, the Library of Congress provided Ebert with original scans at sizes of more than 100 MB. Working with Adobe Photoshop on his computer and, using a pen applied directly onto the screen of the Cintiq 21UX, Michael Ebert then painstakingly restored the damaged images to their original quality. At the same time he enlarged individual details from the images to create entirely new perspectives on the nostalgic photos shot by American Civil War photographers, Mathew Brady, Timothy Sullivan and Alexander Gardner. The retouched images were part of Ebert’s exhibition “The mirror with a memory”, which was on display as part of the Visual Gallery at the 2008 Photokina in Colgne, Germany.

F.C. Gundlach

e-131-gundlach-teaser-big.jpg
Runtime - length of the film: 11m07s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:


Summary:

In this film, photographer and photo-collector, F.C. Gundlach talks to FotoTV at his fashion photography exhibit, discussing his career, his beginnings as a collector and what the word "fashion" means to him. Gundlach explains that fashion comes into being when it is shown publicly and when there is a collective understanding of a new trend, taste, or smell, or whatever else, that trend becomes a fashion. Furthermore he says fashion is not only happening on the runway, or in fashion houses, fashion is also happening on the streets. Interestingly enough, on a technical note, Gundlach has become somewhat of an advocate of digital photography. Initially he thought that through digitizing photography much would be lost in regards to content. But he soon realized that not to be the case. He describes how he came to his first digital photo to be displayed in one of his exhibits. "The last photo from this exhibit, a photo of the Pope, Benedict XVI, was a photo I saw published with an accompanying article in large scale in the FAZ Newspaper's Culture Section. It was very difficult for me to find that photo as the photographer was an unknown from Italy. I finally found her and she told me she didn’t have a photo-- but a data file of the image, and this was the first digital photo to be in one of my exhibits. I was skeptical at first, but changed my mind as did most large publishing houses of that time did. There was no data loss and it was simply advantageous in regards to time constraints. Photos could be sent around the world electronically in a fraction of the time it took to send an image via the postal service. Gundlach is also a genuine admirer and supporter of other photographer's work. He goes on to explain a common feeling many photographers know too well, "Sometimes, photography can be an ambivalent activity. Many photographers have problems with the work of their fellow colleagues. I’ve never had that feeling; to the contrary it interested me. Since I’ve spent a lot of time in America, especially New York, which I nearly never left, with the exception of Los Angeles, I’ve met the American photographers and we had some lively exchanges about photography." Times and styles change, but fashion will always remain inspirational. In closing Gundlach shares with FotoTV a story of one of his most memorable photos, "I remember in the 1960s when fashion was primarily black and white, reduced to forms and patterns. That worked really well for photography and fashion itself. One of my own photos shot for Brigitte magazine, in front of the Gizeh Pyramids, depicting two models wearing bathing caps has become an iconic image. The photo in the magazine is a variation from what we see printed today. That was a moment where the boundaries of fashion photography were transcended, resulting in a photo that will always be significant and timeless." With timeless, Gundlach does not mean meaningless, his photo speaks for itself, as do all the photos in his exhibit. Some might say photos are the intermediaries of fashion, and it is Gundlach who is certain that it will always be the case.

Photo Democracy

e-128-chacun-teaser-big.jpg
Runtime - length of the film: 4m41s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:


Summary:

In this film, portrait photographer Fabien Breuvart discusses a recent large scale project entitled, "Sit and look at the sky", an impressive wall of over 290 photos.

Breuvart is also a collector and seller of antique photographic images, mostly work from unknown or amateur photographers. He owns a fantastic selection of old Paris pictures of anonymous Parisians from the 1920’s to the late seventies, and pictures of some French icons.

Breuvart describes his photography collection of amateur works as being real, wild, and describing a fleeting moment. For his own photography work in the studio, Breuvart uses a simple lighting approach, never attempting to beautify his subjects. He would like his sitters to recognize their personality when they see their photos, something, which he believes, his customers highly value.

For Breuvart, photos are the means to come into contact with other people. You can browse his extensive collection in his store, "Chacun son image", or have your unique portrait taken in the adjacent studio.

Roger Viollet

e-158-roger-viollet-teaser-big.jpg
Runtime - length of the film: 7m38s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:


Summary:

In this film we learn about the dedicated people involved with the historical Roger-Viollet Photographic Agency. Archiving and distributing some of the most memorable and outstanding work of all times, Roger-Viollet became part of the city of Paris’s, “Parisienne de Photographie”, a photographic heritage preservation and development company, in 2005.

Photographer Henri Roger took his first photograph at the age of eleven and by twenty he was an engineer and a pioneer of trick photography. The “trickster” began with variations on the self-portrait: Henri Roger made his first on 7th May 1892, calling it “Man and His Double”, and inventing the term “Bilocation” for images using the same model twice. His technique was nothing more complicated than negatives retouched, masked and printed together.

During the 1890s Roger photographed his entire family for such novelty scenes of middle-class life as in “Family” (1894), “Elegant Ladies in the Luxembourg Gardens” (1895) and “Married Life” (c. 1895).

From 1901 onwards the arrival of his children provided him with a store of participating models, and the family events became photographic ones as well. Each image catches some everyday moment in a way that makes it appealing or unlikely, and it was quite common for the six children to become twelve thanks to the magic of fakery. Henri Roger was the inventor of the “19th-century photo blog”, in which he juggles with pictorial conventions.

A vital catalyst in the creation of Roger-Viollet, Roger initiated his eldest daughter Hélène into the “mysteries of photography” and she remained bitten by the bug. On October 14, 1938, Hélène Roger and her fiancé, Jean-Victor Fischer, took over the photo shop of Laurent Olivier, located at 6 rue de Seine and founded “Documentation Photographique Générale Roger-Viollet”, today internationally known as the Roger-Viollet Photographic Agency, one of the oldest photography agencies in France.

After WWII, Roger-Viollet bought up numerous collections constituting one of the biggest photo banks in Europe by 1960. These collections span more than a century and a half of world history: major events, craftsmen, Beaux Arts, science and politics, the streets of Paris and exotic travels, and of course, famous portraits and candid moments.

This photo heritage – more than 6 million works and documents, which today belong to the city of Paris – also follows the development of photography via the works of photo studios during the Second Empire up to the era of photo reporters capturing the wars of the 20th century.