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Unconventional Light 7: LEDs

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Runtime - length of the film: 12m55s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

LEDs are another light source that are within anyone's budget. They come in different shapes and colors. Bert Stephani got an LED chain to spread on a ladder, which imitates a soft box.

Berts LED chain is even suitable as a background. See how he composes a harmonic Christmas setting by using different lights and props.

Don't shy away from experimenting with lights of any kind, the outcome might be stunning!

Unconventional Light 6: Beauty Light

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Runtime - length of the film: 27m23s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Further into Bert Stephani's workshop the light gets really unconventional. He recreates Rembrandt lighting with a simple light bulb. Bert continues with a beauty shooting by using work halogen lights. The light is softened with surrounding curtains.

Neon tubes are rather large and thereby also have soft box potential. Their shape creates nice cat eyes for your model. Bert shows how he spontaneously implements ideas and flows from one setup to the next.

Unconventional Light 5: Backgrounds

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Runtime - length of the film: 30m40s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Light should not be exclusive to a model but is great to design backgrounds. Bert Stephani starts from a black cardboard and creates a vignette by using a simple speedlight.

The background becomes more blurred the further it moves away from the subject. There are many tools to shape and color light on a background. Bert presents a variety of ways to create depth in some neat looking portraits.

Unconventional Light 4: Reflectors

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Runtime - length of the film: 15m09s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Bert Stephani puts his self made softbox to use that he built previously. To create the impression of a window as a catch light, the light should be fairly close to the model.

Reflectors are another way to lighten up your subject. They can be used with any lightsource and even ambient light. Any reflective object with a wide surface is suitable for this task. See how Bert utilises curtains and even a survival blanket to make the most out of his light.

Unconventional Light 3: DIY Soft box

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Runtime - length of the film: 18m15s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Bert Stephani analyses the ringflash shots he did between the previous session. He used it as fill light in combination with his diffused speedlight. By adjusting the power of the ringflash, he directly controls the contrast.

Soft boxes are an essential light shaping tool. Bert builds one himself in real time with mostly household items and a speedlight. This turns out in a very inexpensive light shaper which he will put to the test in the next session.

Unconventional Light 2: Strobe Light

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Runtime - length of the film: 20m27s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Belgian photographer Bert Stephani knows how to turn a bare strobe light into a soft box with the help of his surroundings.

He likes to use the term of 'marinating' light, as light affects and is affected by its environment. Depending on the power, flashes can either be used as key or fill light.

Bert ultimately combines his strobe light with a diffused speedlight.

Unconventional Light 1: Softbox

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Runtime - length of the film: 22m45s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Any light is conventional, but Bert Stephani knows how to utilise it in most innovative ways.

Over the course of this workshop, he implements various light sources from soft boxes to LEDs. Bert also shows how simple it can be to work with a model.

See first hand how Bert approaches his images. Don't be afraid to always adjust your setup while on the hunt for the perfect shot!

The Digital Pinhole Photography II

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Runtime - length of the film: 17m22s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Martin Timm is back with part two in his series on digital pinhole photography. Here he has gathered all the necessary ingredients to cook up a pinhole adapter that can fit any digital SLR.

The techniques used to construct it is right out of your grade school handicraft's hour. This amazingly simple approach using toilet paper rolls, tin foil, rubber bands glue etc is carefully explained. The result: a ready to use handy-dandy pinhole attachment for your digital camera that's ready to use.

So now it's time to get your feet wet..literally. Martin takes it outside and gives a hands-on demonstration using the pinhole adapter to compose a great picture, demonstrating it works too. So check it out!

A FotoTV Christmas Carol

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Runtime - length of the film: 12m06s
Skill level:
Related films:



Summary:

In this special holiday video, photographer Eberhard Schuy of Loft 2 creates a unique Christmas/New Years memento, exclusively for FotoTV viewers.

Starting with basic materials, such as regular table salt and simple container, Schuy demonstrates step-by-step, how to create an iced-over, frosty Santa Claus, perfect to photograph and use as a holiday card. Although Schuy shows us two unique examples, practically any small item can be used and the creative possibilities are endless.

Normally, the first thing that comes to mind when attempting to photograph ice would be to use ice crystals straight from the freezer. Unfortunately, this technique would last only a few seconds, not leaving much time before melting, making it difficult to capture it on film. Schuy’s technique, creating snow that does not melt by using table salt remedies this problem. The frosted, or iced-over Santa Claus remains exactly as is so that there are no time constraints for making photos.

Moving along, Schuy sets up lighting best for bringing out the structure and detail of the frosty creations. Most photographers are aware of the particulars and troubles when it comes to photographing very bright, or white saturated textures. In addition to the thorough and highly beneficial technical information, Schuy takes several test shots, demonstrating specific techniques and tricks in regards to the lighting to achieve distinct shadows and most authentic looking results, and the results are fun and phenomenal—definitely a great idea for the holidays, as well as a way to try out new ideas.

The Self-Made Boom Stand

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Runtime - length of the film: 4m33s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

In this do-it-yourself video tutorial, Michael Quack from Visual Pursuit Studios shows FotoTV how to make a heavy-duty boom stand out of materials that can be purchased from a local hardware store. Quack constructs a strong and long-lasting boom stand to support the weight of a boom and soft-box, as well as increasing its flexibility to also mount continuous lights, strobes, or other holders. In addition, he explains important aspects to consider, concerning precautionary measures, counterweight, material and size when constructing your own boom stand. This extra sturdy, durable boom stand is the ideal tripod boom stand for countless studio applications and very easy to make.