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David LaChapelle 1

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m 01s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

David LaChapelle is one of the most popular fine-art photographers. He met late Andy Warhol in his time at Interview magazine and even took his last portrait.

Since his youth he worked mainly for galleries and magazines. When he's not shooting Lady Gaga for the cover of Rolling Stone, he pursues own projects.

His series "Landscapes" and "Gas Stations" critically reflect industrialism by showing handmade models of unusual material. Look and substance are always equally important for LaChapelle.

Seascape Photoshooting

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Runtime - length of the film: 19m38s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

International award winning B&W fine art photographer Joel Tjintjelaar gives an introduction to his style of photography, using long exposures and how he processes them to black and white, using his self developed method called SGM and iSGM.

In this first part Joel takes you on a small trip to one of his favorite subjects to show you how he approaches it and photographs it: the Zeelandbridge in the Netherlands. From setting up the shot, to actually taking the shot.

Joel Tjintjelaar

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Runtime - length of the film: 07m31s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Dutch photographer Joel Tjintjelaar practices long-exposure photography since 2006. His award-winning black and white architecture images are iconic.

Initially he experimented with seascapes. The Salk Institute in an Diego was a turning point that made him shift to architecture. Minimalsim and a rich contrast are his most recognisable features.

His awards exposed him to the public eye, to which he shares his expertise in workshops.

The Wet Collodion Process

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Runtime - length of the film: 15m54s
Language: english
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Summary:

The wet collodion process is a process that was developed in 1851 by Frederick Scott Archer.
In this film Stefan Sappert shows us how to implement this antique photography technique.

Stefan explains what collodion is and the best way to photograph using this process.  He also shows us how to develop the photographs and how to make sure exposure is correct.

So check out how Stefan shows us how people like Roger Fenton photographed the American Civil war using just this technique!

Tina Barney II

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Runtime - length of the film: 7m36s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Tina Barney I

Summary:

Tina Barneys narratives literally became more personal, since she did self-portraits in familiar settings.

Finally she explored new grounds, from local museums to central Europe. "Small Towns" documents the life of her domestic small town. The Project about traditions and generations bridges to Barneys earlier work "Theater of Manners".

Tina Barney I

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m05s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Tina Barney II

Summary:

Tina Barneys work can be described as a professional family album. The Museum of Modern Art in New York ignited her passion for photography.

She learned the craft of taking pictures and printing at an art center in Idaho, to make family and friends her later subjects.

Barney staged some of her pictures to create narratives. Her work documents time and became more intimate with it.

Umberto Stefanelli

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m33s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this FotoTV interview Fine Art photographer Umberto Stefanelli discusses his career and also shares some techniques from a project of his. an homage of the late Pope John Paul II and youth around the world.

Stefanelli began his career as a photographer in London and New York. In New York he tried doing fashion photography for a while but the market in New York was so tough that he could not sustain himself as an artist so he went looking for a job. The job he ended up finding was at an art gallery as a curator’s assistant. It was at this point in Stefanelli’s life when he realized his passion for fine art photography. At the gallery his first exhibition was a retrospective of some of the great photographers, including Ansel Adams and soon after Stefanelli called himself a fine art photographer.

Stefanelli describes fine art photography as emotions and passion, “either you have it or you don't”. He further says it does not matter what medium the photo was created, film or digital, but the photo has to have a quality of likeability.

Stefanelli goes on to talk about his project, an homage to the late Pope John Paul II, "not to religion" as he points out, but an a homage to the Pope and all the youths that he touched when he traveled around the world. Stefanelli also shares stories about his move to Japan, which was difficult at first.

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Don't Take Pictures - Make Pictures

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Language: english
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Summary:

The people photographed by Jørgen Brandt treasure forever the photos he makes of them. How does he manage this? Find out in this insightful FotoTV-video.

Based in Copenhagen, Jørgen Brandt is an acclaimed social photographer, a vice president of the Federation of European Professional Photographers and a Qualified European Photographer with Master status (MQEP).

Social photography means for Brandt working with people of all ages, from newborns to the very old. And the secret of making meaningful images of people is never to use traditional poses. "When people come to my studio," says Brandt,  "I try to make them play. It's maybe a silly word to use. We're adults, we don't play. But adults are just children, a little bit older."

"If you think about your kids, or maybe your spouse, the way you think of them is not sitting in a nice chair looking at the camera, perhaps with their head on one side." What is important is a particular look in the eye, perhaps teasing, perhaps loving. The photographer's job is to mediate such situations.

The ultimate aim is to photograph people for what they are, not just for how they look!

It's clear in the interview that photography is for Jørgen a passion and a lifestyle. It's about creativity and imagination. Many of his fine art images are abstract. He likens them to the pictures we saw as children, lying on the grass, looking up at the clouds and seeing elephants and sailing ships and things. In contrast to people photos the important thing here is not "what the subject is, but what else it is." Use your imagination and see things your way.

The video is illustrated with numerous images, both of people and of abstract subjects. Some of them, in particular the beautiful maternity photos, are movingly described.

"It takes devotion to make pictures", says Jørgen. And significantly, the words he most often uses are 'love' and 'fun'.

photokinaTV - High End Photography

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Expert:
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Runtime - length of the film: 12m22s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Mark Dubovoy is a photographer, scientist, and educator. He is known for the super high quality he brings
to his pictures through a disciplined photographic workflow.

What matters to him is the result, and he is preared to make every effort to produce the maximum result
at whatever cost. We'll let his pictures speak for themselves!

You can download a podcast of this photokinaTV show at:
http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=346566809

The Fine Print

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Runtime - length of the film: 3m27s
Skill level:

Summary:

Finally, the fine print has been done. It is presented with a white cardboard frame that enhances the beauty of the photography. Fred Picker comments that the hard part of making photography is not to shoot the camera or to spend many hours in the darkroom; the hard part is to take the correct decisions in order to get the print that the photographer visualized when the photo was taken. Fred Picker was involved in manufacturing of 4 x 5 and 8 x 10 large format field cameras.

He taught a highly successful photography class known as "The Zone VI Workshop," and authored a book by the same name that has become recognized as the golden standard of photographic instruction. His uncanny sense of "photographer's intuition” and his passion for the art was a unique combination. Always opinionated and oft times controversial, his dedication to large format and black and white photography was unsurpassed.