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The Wet Collodion Process

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Runtime - length of the film: 15m54s
Language: english
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Summary:

The wet collodion process is a process that was developed in 1851 by Frederick Scott Archer.
In this film Stefan Sappert shows us how to implement this antique photography technique.

Stefan explains what collodion is and the best way to photograph using this process.  He also shows us how to develop the photographs and how to make sure exposure is correct.

So check out how Stefan shows us how people like Roger Fenton photographed the American Civil war using just this technique!

Tina Barney II

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Runtime - length of the film: 7m36s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Tina Barney I

Summary:

Tina Barneys narratives literally became more personal, since she did self-portraits in familiar settings.

Finally she explored new grounds, from local museums to central Europe. "Small Towns" documents the life of her domestic small town. The Project about traditions and generations bridges to Barneys earlier work "Theater of Manners".

Tina Barney I

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m05s
Language: english
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Tina Barney II

Summary:

Tina Barneys work can be described as a professional family album. The Museum of Modern Art in New York ignited her passion for photography.

She learned the craft of taking pictures and printing at an art center in Idaho, to make family and friends her later subjects.

Barney staged some of her pictures to create narratives. Her work documents time and became more intimate with it.

Joan Fontcuberta

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Runtime - length of the film: 09m28s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Spanish photographer Joan Fontcuberta creates photo art to comprehend our world and explain it to others. Images are powerful documents that require to be critically observed.

His series "Sputnik" deals with photo manipulation in historical context, comparable to incidents in the former Soviet Union. Fontcuberta incorporates himself into his work, so observers might identify what can be believed and what is fake.

"Googlegrams" are digital mosaics consisting of thousands of images gathered from the web. They unite to become an image with two perspectives and multiple meanings.

Preston vs. Brown II

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Runtime - length of the film: 16m41s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Preston vs. Brown I

Summary:

In part two with Preston and Brown, they talk about Photoshop's recent development.

From tools in Photoshop 3 up to CS4, Preston and Brown embrace more of Adobe's software line-up.

Subjects of discussion are the extensive features of Photoshop and how they should be applied in practice depending on the user and his goal. They also regard the capability of Bridge to support one's workflow in the entire Creative Suite.

Third party plugins for Photoshop are another big subject that they expect to develop in the future, as well as camera raw and video support.

Preston vs. Brown I

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Runtime - length of the film: 18m41s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Preston vs. Brown II

Summary:

Russell Brown has been an Adobe employee for 25 years and exchanges his Photoshop expertise with photographer Robin Preston.

Both of them experienced the development of digital image retouching with Photoshop from the outset.  Having started with rub down typesets, the leap to printing texts and working with costly hard- and software to implement CGI was a milestone at that time.

Despite all progress, they adhered to one principle: think analogue, work digitally.

150 Years of Colour Photography

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Runtime - length of the film: 19m12s
Language: english
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Summary:

In this FotoTV film, photographer Gert Koshofer takes viewers on a journey through 150 years of colour film.

2011 was the 150th anniversary of the first exhibited colour photograph in May of 1861 in London, England. 1911 would make today the 100th anniversary first patent registration of the first multi-layer colour film which people know of today. 1936 would make today the 75th anniversary of the first multi-layered colour slide film of Kodachrome.

Koshofer starts out by showing viewers the first print from a slide film that was ever made. It is a photograph of a Scottish meal ribbon, made by Professor Maxwell and was made available to the public in 1861. It was a big problem for Professor Maxwell because he had to go through a very intricate process of creating three different liquid colour filters to be able to project the image. He then projected the images overlapping each other to demonstrate the full colour image. A very time consuming and difficult procedure compared to the simple slide as we know of today.

The first commercially successful colour film material was the Autochrome plate from the Lumiere brothers in their factory in Lyon, France. It was slide positive glass plates. It was unique because paper photos could only be created by very difficult means. The structure that made up the Autochrome plate was the grain pattern consisting of the finest elements made up of potato grain starch colored in green, magenta and orange and having a diameter of 0.01mm. The disadvantage however was the colour shift or colour clumping where colours could form unpleasant color shifts. The light sensitivity from the Autochrome plate was very nominal. In comparison to the ISO values we have today Autochrome had an ISO value of about minus 10.

Koshofer continues on to explain more exciting information about the history of colour film and photography, including the creation of Kodak Kodachrome, a film that was very popular and used world wide until it was taken out of production and off the market, the last developing being offered to customers until 2010.

The Digital Pinhole Photography II

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Runtime - length of the film: 17m22s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Martin Timm is back with part two in his series on digital pinhole photography. Here he has gathered all the necessary ingredients to cook up a pinhole adapter that can fit any digital SLR.

The techniques used to construct it is right out of your grade school handicraft's hour. This amazingly simple approach using toilet paper rolls, tin foil, rubber bands glue etc is carefully explained. The result: a ready to use handy-dandy pinhole attachment for your digital camera that's ready to use.

So now it's time to get your feet wet..literally. Martin takes it outside and gives a hands-on demonstration using the pinhole adapter to compose a great picture, demonstrating it works too. So check it out!

The Digital Pinhole Photography I

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Runtime - length of the film: 15m53s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

This time we're jumping back to the origins of photography. We're talking about pinhole photography. Martin Timm shows us in this film that pinhole photography doesn't have to be a relic of the past. That even a seemingly modern digital SLR can be transformed into the very simple pinhole box camera with little effort or cost. 
 
In this first of a two part series Martin takes us through his passion for this pinhole medium giving us the basics of what makes pinhole photography possible. He defines the simple physics of what happens with a pinhole box and then shows us how it can be applied using modern digital equipment.
 
The simple charm of pin-hole photography can be exploited to great effect with the application of a few of these principles. The mildly soft edges combine with the unique perspective angles to create dream like images and abstractions that can be applied in all photographic styles; Landscape ,Portraits, or Abstract. 
 
We also get to see how Martin has applied these principles to a D-SLR in a Rolls-Royce version incorporating macro extension rings and a compendium bellows, using a punctured soda can for the aperture. In the second film we will see how to apply these principles and build an even lower cost variant to create our own pinhole images.

The Three-Color Photography

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Runtime - length of the film: 14m47s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Adolf Miethe was responsible for the three-color, or Autochrome photographic process. Today exhibition curator Mr. Seibt welcomes us to view the works and achievements of Miethe that have been collected throughout the years.

Seibt has a somewhat personal connection to Miethe in that his in-laws lived not far from the area where Käthe Miethe, Miethe’s daughter resided. This close knowledge sparked Seibt's interest to delve into the personal life of Miethe.

Miethe is known historically in photography for two achievements; he invented the magnesium photo flash along with his colleague Johannes Gädicke around 1889. And his most notable achievement being the completion of his transcending three-color process. Before Miethe’s process came along the term “natural colors” had not even been thought of in the world of photography. It was Miethe who constructed the interchangeable camera. The camera’s principle was that three 9x24cm separate photos were to be made one after the other on photo plates with red, green and blue filters over each photo. Using the three separate photos further to view them in full color happened in that they were either made into a slide transparency, viewed through a device called the Chromascope, enabling all three color filtered images to be viewed as one color photo. The last method was viewing the images through a projector, which consisted of three light channels and three lenses and a control mechanism on the back to control each individual color and project it onto the wall.

Miethe was also known for many other firsts. He made a total of three expeditions in his time a s a photographer. Being less a scientist he concentrated on capturing images in color. He took the first color image of the pyramids and valley of the kings in Egypt and the first color shot of an arctic glacier. Miethe was a also a hot air balloon pilot, capturing aerial images of landscape and towns that were to be used militarily during the world war.

Miethe was seemingly a “Jack of all trades” and being so won him friends as well as enemies, but the ones that knew him personally truly saw him as multi-faceted. This exhibition focuses on the personal aspect of Miethe, but another exhibition is forthcoming about Miethe the artist.