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Tina Barney II

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Runtime - length of the film: 7m36s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:

Tina Barney I

Summary:

Tina Barneys narratives literally became more personal, since she did self-portraits in familiar settings.

Finally she explored new grounds, from local museums to central Europe. "Small Towns" documents the life of her domestic small town. The Project about traditions and generations bridges to Barneys earlier work "Theater of Manners".

Tina Barney I

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m05s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:

Tina Barney II

Summary:

Tina Barneys work can be described as a professional family album. The Museum of Modern Art in New York ignited her passion for photography.

She learned the craft of taking pictures and printing at an art center in Idaho, to make family and friends her later subjects.

Barney staged some of her pictures to create narratives. Her work documents time and became more intimate with it.

Reviews

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m53s
Skill level:

Summary:

In this film, Fred Picker gives us comprehensive insight to his photographic prints from his four previous films on FotoTV; “photographing the wall, photographing the fence, photographing the sculptures, and photographing the river”. All four films and the corresponding prints are meticulously evaluated, along with tips and helpful commentary from Picker. He discusses each print and how he treated it and therefore, why he chose it.

His valuable technical information regarding tonal value, composition, cropping, development time, shapes and forms, aperture and all other relevant terms in his photography and printing are wonderfully reviewed. Picker wraps up this series beautifully with the necessary information not only regarding photography itself, but the mastery of photographic printing.

This film brings a harmonious closure to an exciting and unique film series courtesy of Calumet Photographic Inc. USA. Internationally celebrated photographer, Fred Picker will be long remembered for his photographic work.

Picker’s wide, sweeping wilderness landscapes and intimate studies of natural forms have been held up alongside the work of Ansel Adams, Paul Strand and Edward Weston. Picker was involved in the manufacture of 4 x 5 and 8 x 10 large format field cameras. And his filters, camera designs, tripods and other photographic aids are still considered indispensable tools of the trade by photographers.

He taught a highly successful photography class known as "The Zone VI Workshop," and authored a book by the same name that has become recognized as the golden standard of photographic instruction. His uncanny sense of "photographer's intuition” and his passion for the art was a unique combination. Always opinionated and oft times controversial, his dedication to large format photography was unsurpassed.

Many called Picker’s straightforward approach to the relationship between the "scene" and the final print, pure genius. But Picker himself had a more grounded approach to encouraging his students and other photographers. Picker will always be known for saying, "If you want to know what happens with this or that, don't ask me ... test it." That phrase was simple, but it made perfect sense to the many who have followed his wise advice. With a love for the photographic art form, his contributions to photography as an educator, equipment designer/manufacturer, writer and artist, Picker was a true Pioneer that improved the field of photography.

Picker once wrote, on the occasion of Ansel Adams’s passing away, to "lift a glass to him, he would appreciate that". That’s Picker: always thoughtful, always caring. Fred Picker, 1927 - 2002 *Special thanks to Calumet Photographic USA for making this film available to FotoTV

Photographing the Fence

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Runtime - length of the film: 7m10s
Skill level:

Summary:

In this film, Fred Picker reminds us that shooting in black & white means making the most of shape and form.

Picker continuously searches out the best angle. During the film he says, “Something behind the summit might even be more exciting that what’s in front”. Picker scouts his locations from a low or high vantage point before deciding what appeals to his well-trained photographic eye. Many graphic subjects work good when they are isolated from their surroundings, but then again Picker shows us that rules are made to be broken.

Sometimes the mixture of the graphical elements, horizon, and trees are the differentiations that make an award winning photo and a keen photographer learn even more. In one scene, Picker uses a yellow filter to bring out the detail of fall foliage. It is these little tricks that stick in our mind and help us when we pack our photo-bags and head out to make that perfect shot of our own. Internationally celebrated photographer, Fred Picker will be long remembered for his photographic work. Picker’s wide, sweeping wilderness landscapes and intimate studies of natural forms have been held up alongside the work of Ansel Adams, Paul Strand and Edward Weston.

Picker was involved in the manufacture of 4 x 5 and 8 x 10 large format field cameras. And his filters, camera designs, tripods and other photographic aids are still considered indispensable tools of the trade by photographers. He taught a highly successful photography class known as "The Zone VI Workshop," and authored a book by the same name that has become recognized as the golden standard of photographic instruction. His uncanny sense of "photographer's intuition” and his passion for the art was a unique combination. Always opinionated and oft times controversial, his dedication to large format photography was unsurpassed. Many called Picker’s straightforward approach to the relationship between the "scene" and the final print, pure genius. But Picker himself had a more grounded approach to encouraging his students and other photographers.

Picker will always be known for saying, "If you want to know what happens with this or that, don't ask me ... test it." That phrase was simple, but it made perfect sense to the many who have followed his wise advice. With a love for the photographic art form, his contributions to photography as an educator, equipment designer/manufacturer, writer and artist, Picker was a true Pioneer that improved the field of photography. Picker once wrote, on the occasion of Ansel Adams’s passing away, to "lift a glass to him, he would appreciate that". That’s Picker: always thoughtful, always caring. Fred Picker, 1927 - 2002 *Special thanks to Calumet Photographic USA for making this film available to FotoTV

A Big One

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Runtime - length of the film: 7m40s
Skill level:
Related films:

E. O. Hoppé

Summary:

In this film, Graham Howe, founder, CEO and Director of Curatorial Assistance tells us a an amazing story of six men who had a colossal idea, who put their minds to it and said they could do it, and they did it. This is idea was to build the world’s largest camera and consequently produce the world’s largest photograph.

To the six photographers involved, Jerry Burchfield, Mark Chamberlain, Jacques Garnier, Rob Johnson, Douglas McCulloh and Clayton Spada, the undertaking is part of something bigger than just a really huge picture. A team of six artists of the Legacy Project and an small army of assistants and volunteers converted an abandoned F-18 jet fighter hanger at El Toro MCAS in Orange County, California into a gigantic pinhole camera, then hung a single, seamless piece of light sensitive muslin cloth from the ceiling of the hanger.

Spada presented the idea at a monthly meeting, and the photographers decided, “Let’s go for it!” And so was born The Great Picture project. From 2004 to 2006 the group negotiated with local governments and with the U.S. Government for permission to use an abandoned F-18 fighter jet hanger as a gigantic pinhole camera to produce the world’s largest photograph taken by the world’s largest camera.

The photo was created using the centuries-old principle of "camera obscura" after a gumball-size hole was opened in the hangar's wall, allowing a tiny beam of light to enter. On July 8, 2006, after months of light-tightening the hanger, Building 115, the Legacy Project took the plunge. They would have only one chance to do the job right, so they exposed test strips over the course of several days before deciding on an exposure time of 35 minutes through an aperture of 6 mm (approximately 1/4”) onto a single seamless piece of hand-coated light sensitive muslin that was custom made in Germany.

It was then covered in 20 gallons of light-sensitive emulsion and became the photographic "negative." Howe recalls seeing the fuzzy, 28-by-108 foot black-and-white image.  The photograph shows a dilapidated air traffic control tower, an overgrown runway and palm trees clustered amid rolling hills. Curatorial Assistance is an arts organization that creates and tours art exhibitions that travel to museums worldwide. Curatorial Assistance also publishes art catalogues and books with particular focus on the photographic arts. Graham Howe is also an author, curator, and artist.

Photographing the Sculptures

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Runtime - length of the film: 14m18s
Skill level:

Summary:

In this film, Fred Picker photographs the sculptress Judith Brown on location at her home and Atelier. Brown’s unique way in creating her art form is quite interesting for Picker, and a good way to capture the essence of her work and person. Her sculptures are made from such peculiar and ingenious items such as, twisted steel, mangled metal, automobile rims, license plates, roof ventilators, and even a front end of a Volkswagen Bug.

The location is Vermont and Picker describes it at as a place like no other seen by him before, with sprawling gardens sprouting statues of metal and steel. For a novice or professional, this is definitely a stark scene of contrast worth beholding.

As Picker notes in this film” It is his job as a photographer to do what feels strong and right, otherwise he won’t do it well.” Once again Picker creates subtle portraits of juxtaposed images of brash objects, together in a flowing and iconic portrait sitting of Judith Brown. Picker believes the first picture in such a portrait sitting is usually the best. And he was right. He places Brown in elegant, almost regal poses, amidst all those steel statues. We are enchanted by the results, as Picker humbly explains the logic behind his passion and what excites him.

Technically accurate, Picker gives us even more insight to what equipment and methods he uses. For instance, the 210 mm lens, turned slightly on its vertical access has a very effective outcome for Picker. These are the quiet tips one could only learn from a master.
 
Internationally celebrated photographer, Fred Picker will be long remembered for his photographic work. Picker’s wide, sweeping wilderness landscapes and intimate studies of natural forms have been held up alongside the work of Ansel Adams, Paul Strand and Edward Weston.

Picker was involved in the manufacture of 4 x 5 and 8 x 10 large format field cameras. And his filters, camera designs, tripods and other photographic aids are still considered indispensable tools of the trade by photographers. He taught a highly successful photography class known as "The Zone VI Workshop," and authored a book by the same name that has become recognized as the golden standard of photographic instruction.

His uncanny sense of "photographer's intuition” and his passion for the art was a unique combination. Always opinionated and oft times controversial, his dedication to large format photography was unsurpassed. Many called Picker’s straightforward approach to the relationship between the "scene" and the final print, pure genius. But Picker himself had a more grounded approach to encouraging his students and other photographers. Picker will always be known for saying, "If you want to know what happens with this or that, don't ask me ... test it." That phrase was simple, but it made perfect sense to the many who have followed his wise advice.

With a love for the photographic art form, his contributions to photography as an educator, equipment designer/manufacturer, writer and artist, Picker was a true Pioneer that improved the field of photography.

Picker once wrote, on the occasion of Ansel Adams’s passing away, to "lift a glass to him, he would appreciate that". That’s Picker: always thoughtful, always caring.

Fred Picker, 1927 - 2002

 
*Special thanks to Calumet Photographic USA for making this film available to FotoTV
 

Photographing the River

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m50s
Skill level:

Summary:

In this film, Fred Picker takes us to a location that he has known for 10-12 years. A beautiful river that only he knows about, he finds this location magical as he affectionately names it his “Point Lobos of the East”.

Throughout the film Picker, as always is full of knowledge and wisdom as he discusses the delineated beautiful clean form of the rock and river formations. He decides on photographing the water and stone elements in a 50-50 ratio, calling it his “Yin and Yang principle”. The Chinese idea of balancing each other out; he goes on further to describe how seemingly disjunct or opposing forces are interconnected and interdependent in the natural world, giving rise to each other in turn.

His legendary exposure Zone once again plays an important role when studying and photographing his subjects. These simple rules and guidelines are ubiquitous in Picker’s photographs and even the most professional photographer still always has something new to learn from Picker.

His valuable technical information regarding tonal value, composition, cropping, development time, shapes and forms, aperture and all other relevant terms in his photography and printing are wonderfully reviewed. Picker wraps up this series beautifully with the necessary information not only regarding photography itself, but the mastery of photographic printing. This film brings a harmonious closure to an exciting and unique film series courtesy of Calumet Photographic Inc. USA.

Internationally celebrated photographer, Fred Picker will be long remembered for his photographic work. Picker’s wide, sweeping wilderness landscapes and intimate studies of natural forms have been held up alongside the work of Ansel Adams, Paul Strand and Edward Weston.

Picker was involved in the manufacture of 4 x 5 and 8 x 10 large format field cameras. And his filters, camera designs, tripods and other photographic aids are still considered indispensable tools of the trade by photographers. He taught a highly successful photography class known as "The Zone VI Workshop," and authored a book by the same name that has become recognized as the golden standard of photographic instruction.

His uncanny sense of "photographer's intuition” and his passion for the art was a unique combination. Always opinionated and oft times controversial, his dedication to large format photography was unsurpassed. Many called Picker’s straightforward approach to the relationship between the "scene" and the final print, pure genius. But Picker himself had a more grounded approach to encouraging his students and other photographers. Picker will always be known for saying, "If you want to know what happens with this or that, don't ask me ... test it." That phrase was simple, but it made perfect sense to the many who have followed his wise advice.

With a love for the photographic art form, his contributions to photography as an educator, equipment designer/manufacturer, writer and artist, Picker was a true Pioneer that improved the field of photography.

Picker once wrote, on the occasion of Ansel Adams’s passing away, to "lift a glass to him, he would appreciate that". That’s Picker: always thoughtful, always caring.

Fred Picker, 1927 - 2002

 
*Special thanks to Calumet Photographic USA for making this film available to FotoTV

Photographing the Wall

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m42s
Skill level:

Summary:

In this film, Fred Picker takes us on a step-by-step location scout as he searches for the perfect “scene”, a wall, at a desolate barnyard. His meticulous attention to detail, his intuitive perceptions to tone, light and shadows is masterful. While scouting, Picker casually teaches us things about photography, almost as if quietly taking personal notes. To watch Picker, a master photographer at work and to feel welcome in his presence at the same time, are two things a student, viewer or photographer can be fortunate enough to experience.

Internationally celebrated photographer, Fred Picker will be long remembered for his photographic work. Picker’s wide, sweeping wilderness landscapes and intimate studies of natural forms have been held up alongside the work of Ansel Adams, Paul Strand and Edward Weston.

Picker was involved in the manufacture of 4 x 5 and 8 x 10 large format field cameras. And his filters, camera designs, tripods and other photographic aids are still considered indispensable tools of the trade by photographers. He taught a highly successful photography class known as "The Zone VI Workshop," and authored a book by the same name that has become recognized as the golden standard of photographic instruction.

His uncanny sense of "photographer's intuition” and his passion for the art was a unique combination. Always opinionated and oft times controversial, his dedication to large format photography was unsurpassed. Many called Picker’s straightforward approach to the relationship between the "scene" and the final print, pure genius. But Picker himself had a more grounded approach to encouraging his students and other photographers. Picker will always be known for saying, "If you want to know what happens with this or that, don't ask me ... test it." That phrase was simple, but it made perfect sense to the many who have followed his wise advice.

With a love for the photographic art form, his contributions to photography as an educator, equipment designer/manufacturer, writer and artist, Picker was a true Pioneer that improved the field of photography.

Picker once wrote, on the occasion of Ansel Adams’s passing away, to "lift a glass to him, he would appreciate that". That’s Picker: always thoughtful, always caring.

Fred Picker, 1927 - 2002

 

*Special thanks to Calumet USA for making this film available to FotoTV

 

Photographing with Fred Picker: Introduction

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Runtime - length of the film: 16m33s
Skill level:

Summary:

Here it is, the start of a new series with Fred Picker. The already departed master printer was also an excellent black-and-white photographer, as we can see in this series.

In the first part he analyses some pictures to show us how to achieve vividness and emotion in your photos. Similar structures for example can enhance the expressiveness of your photos. You can also attract more interest in your pictures by using optical illusions. Even after taking the shot, the moods in a photograph can be manipulated by using the different techniques in the darkroom.

Behind the Garage Door

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Runtime - length of the film: 18m32s
Skill level:
Related films:


Summary:

In the 1970s Michael Westmoreland invented a spectacular form of giant panoramic image: the aerial-film colour transparency. He employed very rare antique rotational cameras and a special film-stock which was only manufactured once. Nothing like them had ever been made before, and it is highly unlikely for a number of reasons that anyone will ever repeat the experience.

We are talking about rolls of film emerging from the camera with 500 times the information content of a 35mm slide. This was not technology for its own sake but an intention to make visible astonishing subjects which had never been seen before in such a form.

They were viewed at the time in a number of exhibitions at leading locations and received prestigious awards: however, the work is relatively little known because the reproduction technology of that era couldn’t deal with such large originals and this precluded its use in any form of mass media.

In "Behind the Garage Door" Michael Westmoreland takes us into his now-defunct darkroom to demonstrate the processes involved.