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Portfolio Buildup for Models and Photographers

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Runtime - length of the film: 14m04s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:


Summary:

If photographers are new to the business and do not yet have a meaningful portfolio, it is sometimes difficult to get talented models. Or you have to take a lot of money to book professional shootings. But money may be a problem for some beginning photographers, or they'd rather invest in the equipment.
 
In this tutorial, Bert Stephani gives a practical tip, which always works where people are willing to exchange their services: A photographer supports a young model to build up their portfolio or to make the first few pictures - and in return he receives a shoot in which he can implement his own pictorial ideas.
 
Of course, in this win-win contract the photographic quality has to be right so that the model also wants to give her very best. Bert shows which pictures model agencies and clients would like to see and how they can be realized as quickly as possible, so that there is still time for the photographer's ideas.

A Lightsource in the Picture

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Runtime - length of the film: 06m17s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Bert Stephani's Gear

Summary:

Bert Stephani shows an extraordinary picturestyle, for which he keeps the Flash in the picture frame - something that photographers usually try to avoid by any means.

Showing the lightscource in the picture, can be used to achive really stunning results. Bert shows examples of his Action- oder Wedding-Photography Portfolio.

In this video, he puts a couple on a hill and hands them an Flash-Umbrella to play with.

 

Key light from behind

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Runtime - length of the film: 08m38s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Bert Stephani is not a photographer to stick to rules. He likes to innovate an experiment with the position of his key light, to achieve a special look.
 
A shaded spot in the outdoors is practical for decent portraits, but a little effort enables a very special look. Like every photographer Bert knows that you can accomplish very different results by only changing your lighting.
 
See how Bert makes use of his surroundings and settings to control his light. This is how he does portraits full of character.

Using the Ring Flash II

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Runtime - length of the film: 6m50s
Language: german with english subtitles
Skill level:

Summary:

In this FotoTV series photographer Ralph Man will discuss the Ring Flash for use in beauty and fashion applications. This first installment begins with an in-depth description of the Ring Flash and all that it can do.

Ring Flash offers a stylistic approach to creating nearly shadow free images. Unlike other flash light sources the Ring Flash is attached onto the optical axis of the camera and lens offering shadow free image results.

Ralph Man does an excellent job explaining and demonstrating the specific techniques associated with the Ring Flash. Photographers new to the Ring Flash will find this hands on tutorial very informative.

Composition with Lines

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m59s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

In another film in this series on composition elements Eberhard Schuy is here to explain the use of lines and their application and function in the visuals arts, and in photography in particular.

In the highland moor of the Belgian Ardennes, Mr. Schuy has chosen a long and winding footbridge as the ideal means of demonstrating and explaining the use of lines in photo composition.

The three line types are addressed, individually beginning with the horizontal and then moving to the diagonal and final the tricky application of vertical lines. Through the inventive use of on screen diagrams he shows the effect of the different line types explaining their advantages and disadvantages. This gives us a chance to see what the different line types bring to the photo and their inherent implication. By  demonstration, the natural cause and effects are weighed to show us how to enhance the natural lines through using conscious in-camera editing of the frame.
The natural horizontal is weighed against the flexible and useful diagonal line and balanced through careful use of vertical lines and their placement. Don't pass up this great film.

Three Locations for Nude Photography

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Runtime - length of the film: 16m06s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Photographer Corwin von Kuhwede takes FotoTV viewers on an exciting erotic shooting with his model, Claudia at an abandoned industrial building in Leipzig, Germany.

Today von Kuhwede gives important insight how viewers can find their own interesting motifs in such locations where they initially might think not possible. Going though all disciplines, technical, creative as well as the aspects relating to working with nude models, von Kuhwede accomplishes three different set-ups during difficult weather conditions. The first location that he searches out is on the top floor with open windows letting in the natural light in abundance. He uses a broken window frame as a makeshift swing for model Claudia to swing back and forth on. Von Kuhwede works well with his models always paying attention to body posture and control thereof. It is important for the model to feel comfortable when shooting nude portraits and von Kuhwede does a great job at putting Claudia at ease and taking care of her comfortableness throughout the entire shoot.

Von Kuhwede is also very ingenious when it comes to props and juxtaposing his locations to bring out the best eye-catching contrast. Using ordinary white household curtains hanging down in the run-down industrial building is just one example how von Kuhwede’s mind is always at work creatively. Mixing the old with the new, the modern with the traditional, everything comes together in perfect unison making the sleek erotic photo shooting an instant success. Knowing light and how to modify it also works in von Kuhwede’s favor, whether he uses a reflector or not he is always paying attention to the light and at which angle it is falling onto the model, positioning her accordingly. Von Kuhwede gives an in-depth technical photographic analysis on his choice of camera settings, lenses and post-production photo editing to ensure that viewers can effectively and immediately start out on their own nude portraits. These attentive steps show in the end result, his photos are more than satisfying.

Disco Light

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Runtime - length of the film: 19m51s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this film, freelance, fashion and beauty photographer Michael Gelfert covers the topic of creating a disco atmosphere for a fashion production at club in Frankfurt, Germany.

Gelfert approaches this topic from two angles; one, shooting in an actual disco using the disco lights as part of his shot, and two, recreating a disco look using studio lights covered with colored gels to simulate the colorful lights of a disco.

For the first part of the film, Gelfert works with a lighting technician, especially there to control the disco strobes and spotlights. He comprehensively goes through all settings and equipment that he needs to use to create the look he wants. Needless to say, it is all done with great effort, but the results are brilliant. Working with a beauty dish as his main frontal light, he cannot change the output of his background disco lights, so he must rely on his shutter speed to regulate the brightness of the surrounding backlighting. Something that requires him to use a tripod and stay pretty much in the same position, all very inflexible.

Since Gelfert wants to move about freely and try new perspectives and angles to shoot from, he sets up a simulated disco scene using the beauty dish again as a main frontal light and three flash heads, each with a different colored gel for his background and disco effect. The results are dynamic and authentic looking and it allows him to be more mobile and also shoot at a faster shutter speed since he can now regulate the power output of the backlights.

In conclusion, whichever method photographers choose to use to create a disco look for their photo shoots, both are technically superb. Although one might be more work than the other to control, both still yield professional results and Gelfert does a wonderful job explaining the details and differences between both techniques.