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Bats and Owls

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m20s
Language: english
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Summary:

Nature photographer Dietmar Nill sits down with FotoTV to discuss his early career and present position as a filmmaker of nature and wildlife videos.

Nill reflects on his first request from a client to film a water bat as it drinks, as the ideal moment and catalytic spark for him to begin venturing out into video filming of subjects well known to him. Seizing this moment as a perfect opportunity to further develop and hone his style, he began shooting with a digital camera and with a few clicks of the camera’s buttons became a filmmaker. It fascinated him so much that he has slowly began the transition a year ago to become a full time filmmaker, even though he still shots still photos with a camera for time lapse photography, landscape and sunset photos.

Nill had an idea to photograph bats at night so he had a photoelectric sensor built especially for him because there was no available light on his locations and one of the problems he faced was the trigger delay time of the cameras he was using.

So now he always uses a photoelectric sensor for making his photographs of the animals in the wild. In this respect, the animals are literally taking a photo of themselves because they trigger the sensor with their movement, something Nill describes as fascinating.

Nill’s photos start out as an idea and he works toward that idea regardless of how long it takes---even years, until he can actually create the photo, with everything in place, all materials and equipment, he sets out to make the ideal photograph. He was born with a talent, and that talent is he can build a relationship to the animals he photographs, knowing how to act around the animals and how the animals will react to him and what they will do, even before he takes the picture. He has a lot of experience and therefore recognizes their behavior, foreseeing what will take place in the next minute enabling him to be prepared to photograph or film the animal to create stunning images.

Analogue Night Photography

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Runtime - length of the film: 9m07s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Digital Night Photography

Summary:

Leo Seidel is a photographer from Berlin, Germany specializing in night photography, better yet, and twilight photography. Today he sits down to explain what his shooting methods are in the second part of this two part series on how to take good night photographs.

For the second segment, Seidel focuses on analogue night photography using a large format analogue camera and digital camera, to make comparisons between the two. Seidel also gives a recap of all that was learned in the first part of this series, on digital night photography. He discusses the technical aspects, the choice of lighting, and the weather conditions that can make digital night photography ideal.

Since shooting analog and digital are shooting two different types altogether. Seidel clarifies the differences between the two in regards to night photography. He highlights both their strengths and weaknesses and in what situation you are better off choosing which medium. Analogue definitely has its advantages; it is highly stylistic and very exquisite looking. It is definitely a very sophisticated way for photographers to show what they can do. But analogue photography is expensive. Very expensive in comparison to digital files, which are free. But Digital photography does have its strengths and advantages as well and Seidel does an excellent job listing the pros and cons.

Most importantly, Seidel stresses that photographers should have fun with night shooting and experiment as much as possible and always be on the lookout for things to shoot. There are three things technically that Seidel knows close to perfection that help him create such amazing photos, aperture, exposure time, and ISO. But his biggest advantage by far is having the eye for the right shot at the right time.
 

Digital Night Photography

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m07s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Leo Seidel is a photographer from Berlin, Germany specializing in night photography, better yet, and twilight photography. Today he sits down to explain what his shooting methods are in the first part of this two part series on how to take good night photographs.

For the first segment, Seidel focuses on digital night photography using a Nikon D3X, which he primarily uses for night work.  Armed with two wide-angle lenses, Seidel sets out to photograph on allied airfield in Tegel, Berlin.

Seidel likes to capture movement at night over an extended period of time. Cars leaving a trail of light down the street and people only registering as outlines or shadows make for some very non-descript yet ethereal photo scenes. But that’s what makes his photos all the more attractive because we can all identify with the situations one way or another—even if we’ve never seen anything like it.

There are three things technically that Seidel knows close to perfection that help him create such amazing photos, aperture, exposure time, and ISO. But his biggest advantage by far is having the eye for the right shot at the right time.
 

How to Shoot Northern Lights

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Runtime - length of the film: 9m50s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Lucky for us geologist and physicist Hinrich Bäsemann is here to not only explain the occurrence of the phenomenal light show referred to as the Northern Lights but also to explain how to photograph them as well.

After a scientific explanation regarding the "what" of the lights and the "when" they are visible, he lays out what conditions are "most likely" to result in an occurrence. It isn't always a given you know! He gives tips on sources for weather, and sun activity to try and insure that your trip up north is worthwhile.

His great respect for nature and the honor he feels to be be working in this very unique part of the world are obvious in his enthusiastic descriptions of the landscape and his own long-year experience in trying to capture this wide spectral phenomenon.

A detailed description of the necessary equipment complete with tips on how to dress; how to acclimatise your equipment; how to handle memory chip cards, and how to apply your newly honed skills to gain further amazing images.It's good to have a Great Northern Guide to the lights! Enjoy!