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A Lightsource in the Picture

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Runtime - length of the film: 06m17s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:

Bert Stephani's Gear

Summary:

Bert Stephani shows an extraordinary picturestyle, for which he keeps the Flash in the picture frame - something that photographers usually try to avoid by any means.

Showing the lightscource in the picture, can be used to achive really stunning results. Bert shows examples of his Action- oder Wedding-Photography Portfolio.

In this video, he puts a couple on a hill and hands them an Flash-Umbrella to play with.

 

Key light from behind

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Runtime - length of the film: 08m38s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Bert Stephani is not a photographer to stick to rules. He likes to innovate an experiment with the position of his key light, to achieve a special look.
 
A shaded spot in the outdoors is practical for decent portraits, but a little effort enables a very special look. Like every photographer Bert knows that you can accomplish very different results by only changing your lighting.
 
See how Bert makes use of his surroundings and settings to control his light. This is how he does portraits full of character.

Being a Sexy Women Photographer

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Runtime - length of the film: 17m04s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Dan Hostettler shares his experience as a commercial nude photographer.

He is one of few experts who can make a living off his job. But nude photography is both a dream job and serious business. One has to develop techniques and practice human interaction to stay on top. To find a niche and specialize in it is a must.

There would be no business without the web. Dan runs a blog on wich he offers free tutorials and making-of-content to bind his customers.

Nude Photography in Prague

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Runtime - length of the film: 18m40s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Prague and its photography business changed over the recent years. Those who want to pursue that profession do not find cheap but fair solutions.

Nude photographers find everything they need: Playboy models, makeup artists, studios and outdoor locations, equipment and accommodation. Dan Hostettler prepared a list for FotoTV.subscribers with adresses that might be of use.

Dan provides an impression of Prague as a nude location. Feel free to contact him personally for further info.

Changing Light Direction

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Runtime - length of the film: 13m22s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Don't wait for perfect light and perfect days! Bert Stephani from Belgium shows you how to optimize every light situation in order to make good pictures whenever and wherever you want.

In a city like Cologne (the location of the video) usually the light comes from above. But that light direction throws shadows onto your model so that she looks tired and sepless. The solution is changing the light direction.

Bert demonstrates a few direction changing techniques like using a reflector or an on camera flash or working with an umbrella.

 

Working the City

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Runtime - length of the film: 15m16s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Bert Stephani invites us into a creative city trip in Cologne. He shows that we can find perfect photo locations wherever we are. During a little walk of only a few hundred meters he demonstrates four totally different locations.

To prevent that photos look boring by repeating similar locations he uses out of focus foreground elements or interesting textures in the background. He experiments with the concentrated atmosphere of a market and changes the colours of pictures in order to give them a different mood.

Sense of sunset

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Runtime - length of the film: 12m40s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Bert Stephani is a photographer from Belgium. In this FotoTV. photo course he shows us how to change a great day into a sunny day by using one simple Speedlite. As well as in his other FotoTV. movies he tries to adopt the ambient light while just adding the flash in order to make pictures look natural.

And he demonstrates a very special effect: The "lense flare". You can create that effect when you let the sun directly hit the lense of your camera. On that way you get the retro look of a sunny day in the 70's or 80's. This look can be ampflified by playing with the colour saturation and with other settings.

A Sunny Sunday Morning

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Runtime - length of the film: 13m08s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Bert Stephani is a photographer from Belgium. In this FotoTV. course wie visit him in a hotel room: 

In a shooting with his model Swetlana he shows aus how to change the boring, single-coloured impression of that room into the atmosphere of a sunny sunday morning.

For Bert the ambient light is very important. By using a simple potted plant and one or two flashes he tries to imitate the real sunlight, projecting the shadows of a real tree onto the room's walls.

Colour Contrast

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Runtime - length of the film: 09m57s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:


Summary:

Eberhard Schuy is on the road again. Here on the Belgian border, in a field of narcissuses, he demonstrates compositional techniques using colour.

We are initially confronted with a wide meadow with a vivid display of colours. A primer course on the colour and colour contrasts ensues, where we learn the modes implied with certain colours and what their combinations might imply to the viewer.

Not content to simply give us a wide array of colours to delight the eye, Eberhard wants to deconstruct the images. We see through reduction we can make well constructed photos. By first reducing the field and with that the colors, we can then concentrate on making a photographic statement.

By even further reduction of the colour scheme, we arrive at the ultimate contrast on the colour scale and see how this complimentary contrast enhances the photographic statement. As a further study in colour, he then shows how the opposite colour statement can also be incorporated.

So jump in and see how you can incorporate colour and colour contrast to enhance your next pictures.

High Noon Shooting

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Runtime - length of the film: 16m05s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Taking photos during the hours from about 11:00 am to 2:00 pm is considered to be the time better known to most photographers as “High Noon”, the hours that are considered most difficult to photograph in. Today, Mike Larson is going to show us several useful tips and practice shootings on just how to remedy the situation so photographers can be most effective with their shooting time. Larson takes the “no choice, no options” of high noon shooting and turns it in to a perfect problem solving light.

During the high noon hours the light from the sun is more direct and harsh, giving your subjects unpleasant shadows and leaving images flat or blown out. One option Larson suggests is to use a reflector to fill in the harsh shadows, it reflects sunlight back on to your subject and they are economical and easy to use. One thing a photographer should always be on the lookout for while shooting during midday hours is open shade. This will always prove to be very useful, as we learn from Larson. He further goes on to explain color temperature differences in light and the importance of correcting exposures by using a polarizing filter. Using a polarizing filter not only makes the sky darker, or bluer, but it also takes away light and reflections, allowing more saturated colors and a more overall pleasing image.

Paying attention to where shadows fall will solve most of your initial problems, such as where to place the subject, and which direction the light is coming from. Moving on however, most photographers tend to stick their subjects in open shade, while a contrasting over-exposed background distracts the image as a whole, but as Larson demonstrates, understanding contrast, subject placement and light diffusion and how to use them together will yield excellent results.