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Portfolio Buildup for Models and Photographers

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Runtime - length of the film: 14m04s
Language: english
Skill level:
Related films:


Summary:

If photographers are new to the business and do not yet have a meaningful portfolio, it is sometimes difficult to get talented models. Or you have to take a lot of money to book professional shootings. But money may be a problem for some beginning photographers, or they'd rather invest in the equipment.
 
In this tutorial, Bert Stephani gives a practical tip, which always works where people are willing to exchange their services: A photographer supports a young model to build up their portfolio or to make the first few pictures - and in return he receives a shoot in which he can implement his own pictorial ideas.
 
Of course, in this win-win contract the photographic quality has to be right so that the model also wants to give her very best. Bert shows which pictures model agencies and clients would like to see and how they can be realized as quickly as possible, so that there is still time for the photographer's ideas.

Bert on the Street 2

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Runtime - length of the film: 08m24s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Street photography can be performed actively or passively. Bert recommends to keep a low profile for beginners to capture authentic situations.

He reveals 3 tricks to not stand out as a photographer. Mind your behaviour and consider your options in technology that is actually available to everyone.

street photography benefits from lots of practice and the occasional lucky moment. Sooner or later decisive moments will find their way onto your sensor.

Bert on the Street 1

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Runtime - length of the film: 09m25s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Bert Stephani introduces you to the magic of street photography. Despite being an experienced photographer, being out on the street is always an exciting experience.

The appeal is to observe situations that you cannot direct. It takes a fair amount of luck to capture strangers in special constellations.

Bert recommends how to behave in the street to not draw attention to yourself. There's also gear especially suitable for street photography, while other is better left at home. He also shares advice on how to approach strangers.

Small Model in Wide Scenery

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m11s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Bert Stephani and his model Jennifer are back in the Belgian countryside. This time Bert dares something unusual:
 
In portrait photography, whether in studio or outdoors, the model should play the central role in the picture. Usually photographers work with short distances and blurred backgrounds. Bert does it differently: he combines portrait and landscape photography in such a way that the model becomes part of the landscape and still stands out.
 
This is not an easy photographic exercise. On one hand the model should be noticed by the viewer, on the other hand she should not fall out of the picture. The photographer has to consider many things at the same time: eye-catching poses are important to make the small model visible in the wide landscape.
 
Visual accent, lighting, colors, lines and shapes are all important elements of a picture. Even experienced professionals like Bert have to look out for these.

Lea Lund & Erik K.

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Runtime - length of the film: 09m06s
Language: french with english subtitles
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this FotoTV. interview Lea Lund and Erik K. talk about their meeting and their photographic long-term project.
 
In July 2011, the two met by chance because Erik, a guest at a wedding, smoked a cigarette outside on the street. This encounter turned into the first photo and that into a love affair - since then Lea photographs Erik. She does this every day, all over the world and from every angle.
 
Erik always remains the motive, but the real theme of the pictures are the places where they emerge. The two pay very much attention to the local setting and to special picture elements.
 
Lea's background as a designer leads her to draw all pictures with drawings. She doesn't betray us, what exactly and how she does it. "It would be careless," she says with a smile.

The Third Dimension

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m02s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Photography is a two-dimensional medium. Images have a width and a height, but no depth.
 
But the more experienced a portrait photographer is, the higher become his claims to a three-dimensional look. A picture shall occur to the viewer as if the model could pop out of the image in the next moment. Frequently used strategies to increase the plasticity of the image are, for example, wide-angle lenses, long lenses, shadows and leading lines.
 
In this tutorial Bert Stephani discusses another solution, namely adding a foreground to the picture. If one chooses a foreground that cooperates with the background in a good way, one gets an extra dose of depth. A good combination is achieved when the foreground contrasts with the background but as well matches. The contrast should not require too much of the viewer's attention because that would make the model less visible. Bert shows which contrasts are particularly suitable, where to find them and how to use them.

Key light from behind

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Runtime - length of the film: 08m38s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Bert Stephani is not a photographer to stick to rules. He likes to innovate an experiment with the position of his key light, to achieve a special look.
 
A shaded spot in the outdoors is practical for decent portraits, but a little effort enables a very special look. Like every photographer Bert knows that you can accomplish very different results by only changing your lighting.
 
See how Bert makes use of his surroundings and settings to control his light. This is how he does portraits full of character.

Changing the Direction of Natural Light

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Runtime - length of the film: 13m35s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Changing Light Direction

Summary:

We paid a visit to Bert Stephani in Belgium. He stepped into the woods with his fellow speedlight. With it, he tries to change the direction of ambient light. This can be achieved with the right combination of given light sources.

Bert's model is lit by daylight which becomes softened by clouds and surroundings. As he takes pictures, he demonstrates how to use a flash to combine it with natural light. After all he desires a natural look that doesn't give away the use of a speedlight.

Subject in Motion

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Expert:
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Runtime - length of the film: 07m50s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Ben Jaworskyj is moving way too fast to stop action with him. It's hard to imagine him any other way.

Here is Ben with a neat approach to bring movement and action in your pictures. As his approach is always less equipment - more results, Ben demonstrate a unique way to bring or keep the motion in the picture via timed exposure and use the flash to keep the subject sharp. 

When it's time to show motion, his approach is everything moves.. the subject, and the photographer too.  Since there's movement all around it's only the briefest of moments required to show the subject sharp and the let the movement surround him.... right?. How to do this?..Well you need to tune in to this video..

The Brenizer Method

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Runtime - length of the film: 6m33s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Hendrick Niermann wants to share a quick technique tip that uses mixes shallow depth of field and panorama stitching..

Sounds weird? Not really. Hendrik first defines the problem: You want shallow depth for the great out of focus background effects, but you want to incorporate a wider frame to bring in more of the surroundings to accompany the subject; in this case a bridal pair.

So what to do? Here's a technique that lets you keep the shallow depth and it's ensuing "Bokeh" across a scene that would otherwise be rendered in greater focal depth. This is not just for wedding photographers you can use this technique for other subjects too. Be sure to tune in.