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Ryan Brenizer

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m19s
Language: english
Skill level:
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The Brenizer Method

Summary:

"Brenizer" should be a familiar name in the world of photography. It's a novel photo technique we've introduced in a previous video. Ryan Brenizer is the pioneer of this method and one of the most famous wedding photographers.
 
We met the New Yorker in Italy for an interview. Having started in journalism, he eventually found into photography and combined it with his passion for weddings.
 
He and his wife Tatiana are an experienced team. Ryan shares what's important to him in photography and what kind of response he tries to achieve.

Beautiful Tuscany

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Runtime - length of the film: 17m22s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Helmut Plamper, who has lived in Tuscany for about four years has invited FotoTV along to view some of the most beautiful scenic spots in and around Tuscany. The photo-tour begins in majestic Montefelonico, which is near Montepulciano. Of particular interest here is the Hotel La Costa, which Plamper calls the “Photo Hotel,” because of its convenient location and the amazing panorama that can be photographed directly from the hotel window by good visibility. Plamper explains that the wonderful landscape colors, tones of brown and green, not only result from the soil quality, but also from the artists of Tuscany. “They are artists that cultivate the fields with their tractors,” he quips. “And when the soil has been freshly plowed you see the dark soil, which results marvelously, in what the Americans term, “Pattern Shots.” You can’t find this great aspect anywhere as good as here in Tuscany.” Tuscany has an abundance to offer, with its many photogenic scenes, and rolling landscape. Some of the other notable tour stops included, but were not limited to, Crete Senesi, Val Dorccia, Belvedere, and San Quirico. On the road, San Quirico to Pienza, there is the admired Chapel Daveta Leta; it is a popular photo motif in Tuscany. Most impressive in the area are the many newly planted cypress trees. Plamper explains that a couple of decades prior there was a mass number of cypress tree deaths, due to a type of tree canker disease. And in the meantime many cypress trees have been reforested in an attempt to resurrect the original scene of Tuscany, to ensure magnificent cypress tree scenery that the people of Tuscany and photo-enthusiasts alike, love so well. Plamper gives useful information on traveling to and from Tuscany, as well as insider tips, and ideal times to photograph specific areas and locations there, around the year.

Gigapanorama

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Runtime - length of the film: 14m35s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this film, FotoTV founder Marc Ludwig visits the Museum for Industrialization in Wuppertal to test the GigaPan robotic device, a tripod-mounted, motorized camera robot that automates the process of creating massive, gigapixel-size panoramas. Beginning with complete theoretical aspects, we learn from Ludwig that the GigaPan is really quite easy and uncomplicated to handle.

Almost any compact digital camera will fit onto the adjustable mounting plate. Moving on to practical examples, and after a short calibration of the manual settings on the digital camera, Ludwig sets up a scene to photograph while discussing the importance of specific settings crucial to shooting panoramas with the GigaPan. The device works by taking many zoomed-in shots of a chosen scene, with each one at a slightly different angle.

These photographs are then stitched together seamlessly by GigaPan’s software, on the computer. In conclusion, GigaPan produces astonishing detail, is amazingly simple to operate, and an overall well-built device that creates photos that are artistically good as well as technically interesting.

Behind the Garage Door

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Runtime - length of the film: 18m32s
Skill level:
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Summary:

In the 1970s Michael Westmoreland invented a spectacular form of giant panoramic image: the aerial-film colour transparency. He employed very rare antique rotational cameras and a special film-stock which was only manufactured once. Nothing like them had ever been made before, and it is highly unlikely for a number of reasons that anyone will ever repeat the experience.

We are talking about rolls of film emerging from the camera with 500 times the information content of a 35mm slide. This was not technology for its own sake but an intention to make visible astonishing subjects which had never been seen before in such a form.

They were viewed at the time in a number of exhibitions at leading locations and received prestigious awards: however, the work is relatively little known because the reproduction technology of that era couldn’t deal with such large originals and this precluded its use in any form of mass media.

In "Behind the Garage Door" Michael Westmoreland takes us into his now-defunct darkroom to demonstrate the processes involved.