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Exploration of Childhood

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Runtime - length of the film: 19m23s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

New Zealand photographer Niki Boon talks about the photographic documentation of her children.

Since Niki and her husband decided to teach their children at home, Niki takes pictures of their everyday life.

Publishing her black and white photos on Facebook brought her much fame, but at the same time a lot of criticism. She has learned to deal with it and continues to make daily pictures to leave something to her children. This is something, Niki does not have from her own childhood.

Pieter Hugo

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Runtime - length of the film: 7m10s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Pieter Hugo is a photographer from South Africa. In his works such as "The Hyena Men", "Permanent Error" or "Kin" he deals with the various faces of his homeland. In about 10 years Hugo has created a considerable body of work that shows the complexity and contradictions of society.
 
In this FotoTV. interview he talks about his photographic journey that started at the age of 12. His training was done purely practical in the form of contract work as a photojournalist. The barriers of rhythm und visual language in photojournalism however led him into an independent, more artistic career.

Rob Hornstra

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Runtime - length of the film: 13m28s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Rob Hornstra is a dutch photo journalist. He sees himself more as a storyteller than a photographer. During his studies at the art academy, he found out that photography itself was very easy. But not every photographer can also tell a story. As a journalist who wants to reach a wide public, he soon realised that a good concept is necessary to tell good stories.

Hornstra is well known for is Sochi project, which is the main topic of this interview.

Bill Perlmutter

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Runtime - length of the film: 12m40s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Bill Perlmutter was born in 1932, he lives and works in New York.

After his photography studies he worked as a press photographer for the U.S. Army in Germany. In his spare time he photographed places and scenes in Germany, France, Italy, Portugal and Spain. His photographs reflect the European post-war period, which is characterized by deprivation but also confidence and affirmation of life.

In the summer of 2013 Perlmutter's work was first exhibited in Germany. FotoTV. was there and could win him for an interview.

David Burnett 3

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Runtime - length of the film: 12m21s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

David Burnett recollects the Iranian Revolution and the Summer Olympics of 1984.

He portrayed Ayatollah Khomeini and the vast crowds during the revolution. His encounter with French war photographer Patrick Chauvel, wo was in urgent need of film, led to a charming experience amidst the people of the revolution.

One dramatic highlight at the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles happened right in front of his lens. The fallen athlete Mary Decker became one of his most iconic pictures.

David Burnett 2

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m41s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Burnett was on site of a napalm attack during the Vietnam War where his colleage Nick Ut shot one of the most memorable war pictures. He describes the incident from witnessing the impact over developing in the darkroom until the global media published the picture.

In 1976 he did a story on Bob Marley, just about before his commercial breakthrough. He enjoyed the rich experience and being able to portray him in a genuine manner.

David Burnett 1

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Runtime - length of the film: 09m35s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Photojournalist David Burnett took the time to share his colorful career in three parts.

He has always stuck to politics and portrayed every US president since Kennedy.

In 1969, he witnessed his nation reach for the moon. On its 40th anniversary, he reconnected with people who were children back then. It reminded Burnett, that photography is about sharing and memories, more than anything else.

Stanley Greene

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m41s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this interview photographer Stanley Greene discusses his work and career over the last 25 years, which exposed him to the births of new dawns, rising and falling empires, invasion of countries, liberations of others, mass migrations, deportations, displacements, famines, conflicts, wars and destructions. He worked on the five continents trying to document the human condition.

Greene began his art career as a painter but started taking photos as a means of cataloging material for his paintings. In 1971, when Greene was a member of the anti-war movement and the Black Panthers, his friend, photographer W. Eugene Smith offered him space in his studio and encouraged him to study photography at the School of Visual Arts in New York and the San Francisco Art Institute.

 

Laura Pannack

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Runtime - length of the film: 15m57s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Laura Pannack, a young British photographer, sits down to discuss her work and several photographic projects focusing on the lives of modern youth today.

Resembling an imperfect social documentary, Pannack’s work is an intimate and captivating look at young people during different stages of their life and the situations and people they encounter. Discussing the details of one of her projects, Pannack talks about spending two weeks, “with friends” in the woods at a youth camp photographing the individual lives of the camp participants. The photos reveal a more subdued look than that of general public stereotypes of crazed teenagers who smoke and drink obsessively, have unlimited premarital sex, and with nothing but incessant thoughts of texting and Nintendo Wii swirling in their heads. Pannack does an excellent job and her photos are quite a striking exhibition of unlikeness and refreshingly honest.

“Young Love” is another compelling project Pannack worked on that brought her very close to her subjects, sometimes forming lasting friendships. Young love is synonymous with the beginning of real hopes of marriage, sex, and commitment, albeit commitment is limited as few high school relationships lead to marriage, but Pannack’s photos acknowledge the youths are just fine living in the moment. Her images succeed in taking the viewers to an extreme level of voyeuristic intimacy, the many intriguing compositions symbolizing adolescent thoughts, dreams, emotions and all the complex feelings that make us human.

Ed Kashi

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Runtime - length of the film: 16m53s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Ed Kashi is charismatic proponent of photojournalism. In this FotoTV video he is spell-bindingly direct and passionate about his work. For him it all began as a teenager wanting to tell stories, and then going to college to learn to be a writer. In the freshman year the students had to make photographs too. And the young Kashi had never done this before. So he borrowed money from his family and rented a Ricoh. That was the beginning of a switch from words to pictures.

That’s why he calls himself a visual storyteller and why he’s been telling stories now from all over the world for over thirty years.

His motivation is a compassionate and engaged interest in social and political themes. His general approach is to choose an issue and work on it in depth. And by ‘in depth’ we’re not talking about days, weeks or months: We’re talking about five years working in the Niger Delta on oil, development and militancy, about eight years on aging in America.

His first significant project was on the protestant community in Northern Ireland.  The resulting images appearing in a small, self-published book. This led to his working in 1991 for the National Geographic Magazine. A 26-week contract covering the Kurds was followed by a project on the Jewish settlers on the West Bank.

This project, however, was brought to a sudden end by the then rapidly expanding Internet. It never occurred to Kashi, and probably to most other photojournalists at that time, that the subjects of their work would actually see and read about themselves. In this very early case it was the words accompanying the images on the Internet that caused consternation amongst the settler community. They told to get out!

Beginning in 1995 Ed realized that he wanted to look at his own culture in America. He chose an issue that will increasingly affect all western cultures, at many levels, and for the coming twenty to thirty years: Aging - a demographic shift of gigantic proportions. Many older people will remain fit and full of life. But many will be poor, depressed and lonely. We will need massive number of caregivers, not only health specialists but also simple companions and helpers. Kashi’s involvement here is almost tangible; it shines through what he says and in some of his most moving images.

Moving images, this time in the literal sense of video, is another subject on which Kashi has interesting things to say. While he uses video himself, he makes an impassioned plea for the value of still photography. “Moving images wash over you – they are passive. They don’t require much of the viewer. A still photograph requires the viewer to work, to look carefully. You need to look for detail. You need to analyse. You need to read some kind of contextual information to understand what is going on.  It demands that you think. It’s almost meditative.”

In 2009 Ed Kashi published ‘Three’, a book of trypticons. It was a dramatic departure from photojournalism. Perhaps inspired by the multiple screens common in multimedia events, the photographs in each set of three may come from entirely different places and siituation, but they share something that makes a new statement, gives a new insight.

Despite the shrinkage of printed ‘real estate’ for visual storytelling, photojournalism, according to Ed Kashi, is more alive and vibrant in all corners of the globe than ever before. He is full of encouragement for young photographers. Their work appears mostly online: “It’s just that we haven’t yet figured out a way to make a living out of this!”

Ed’s philosophy, and the message of this video is that ultimately, to make good photographs you have to tap into your creative soul, into your passions. Know what is it you want to do with your work. The camera is only a tool.