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Hiroshi Sugimoto

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Runtime - length of the film: 08m28s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Hiroshi Sugimoto resides studios in Tokyo and New York. He created some impressive series during 40 years of his professional work.

"Theaters" has been in the making for 26 years. Long-exposed theater screens illuminate the interior space. He combined learning the craft of a photographer with that of an artist.

In "Seascapes" he visualised childhood memories. Sugimoto noticed that our ancestors saw oceans with the same eyes as we do today, while landscapes have changed significantly.

He also documented the life of a candle and spectral colours.

Make Misteaks!

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Runtime - length of the film: 16m55s
Language: english
Skill level:
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The Impossible Project

Summary:

In this photo workshop Martin Krolop talks about important design rules and principles of photographic ...

and ... throws them all to the wind!

If you want to give your photographs an individual style, then this is not possible with the conventional rules of photography. The trick is to be extreme and to make mistakes consciously. Focus on the eyes was yesterday. Martin blurrs images, sets the focus point anywhere but not on the eyes and shoots a portrait with the wide-angle lens. Finally, Martin uses the Polaroid camera in order to counteract potential image sharpness.

It is not about to photograph carelessly and furiously, but be aware of the limitations of current esthetic systems to be and to decide against it. This way you can expand your horizons - and you realize why some rules were not set up for no reason.

So try it!

Christopher Makos

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Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Christopher Makos reminds one uncannily of Andy Warhol. His hair is untamed, almost over the eyes, sticking out at odd angles; he wears thick-rimmed black glasses, a shiny, pale green, patterned jacket and a black and white checked shirt. In this interview at the Flo Peters Gallery, made on a snowy day in Hamburg, Germany, he describes his meetings with and anecdotes about the great master of pop art. We get vivid impressions of the New York scene then and now.

Makos met Warhol at the opening of a retrospective exhibition of Warhol's work at the Whitney Gallery in New York. Makos thought Warhol was already dead! He was naturally  quite surprised then, to meet him there. Warhol invited him o 'The Factory' but he never wentthere.

Making books of photographs is what interests Chris Makos. Amazon lists 30 titles authored or co-authored by him. Of these, 15 are about Andy Warhol. In this video we learn that Andy Warhol was surprised that there was no 'elevator' up to the Great Wall and that clothing fashions in China were changing because, "At that time they were just switching over to democracy and to a different kind of vibe".

"I always tell people that I'm not gonna do any more books, " says Makos, "especially on Andy Warhol. But somehow they always come to me and they say, 'Do you wanna do this book?' And so what happens is, er, I say, 'yes' because I love doing books, creating books, art-directing books, working on other peoples books."

Makos has made four books in collaboration with Paul Solberg with whom he works closely, sometimes even subsuming his individual identity under their joint pseudonym, the Hilton Brothers.

In this video Makos talks about two books in particular and numerous examples from them are shown. 'Andy Warhol in China: The Photographs of Christopher Makos' contains photographs of his 1982 trip to China with Andy Warhol. It was published in 2008 during the Beijing Olympics.

A second book just published in Italy is titled "Chris Makos Polaroids". It contains Polaroids from the 1970s. The Polaroid Company came to the factory and said "Oh you know we're gonna give everybody boxes and boxes of Polaroids just to see what artists can do with Polaroids." Makos immediately started taking pictures of everything: "People, places, Debbie Harry, Lou Reed, Man Ray, this girls tits, some guy's ass, Marilyn Monroe." All these photos were put away in boxes for three decades or so until a publisher asked Makos if he had more material from that period. He had, and they made the book.

Christopher Makoswas born 1948, in Lowell, Massachusetts.He grew up in California before moving to Paris to study architecture, where he later worked as an apprentice with the legendary Man Ray.

"Taking pictures", for Christopher Makos, "is sort of like the hunger for a really delicious meal."

photokinaTV - The Impossible Project

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Runtime - length of the film: 9m35s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

When Polaroid stopped production of their instant picture film, some folks came up with an impossible idea. Why not produce the instant film ourselves. So they purchased the the complete production equipment and got started.
This spring they did „the impossible“ For some Polaroid cameras you can once again get instant B&W and color film.

Andreas Hentschel and Marlene Kelnreiter are with us in the studio demonstrating exactly that this can be done. Next up on the agenda for the „Impossible Project“ is a solution to seperate the battery from the film pack, charge it back up and save the environment at the same time. Seems like the sky the limit when were talking Impossible projects.

You can download a podcast of this photokinaTV show at:
http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewPodcast?id=346566809

The Impossible Project

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Runtime - length of the film: 18m07s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

“The Impossible Project” is the name of the exciting undertaking to bring back Polaroid film. FotoTV was at production headquarters in Eschede, Holland, to meet those responsible for this incredible project. For instance, boss and initiator, Florian Kaps, who is the driving force behind the project. Furthermore, we’ll take a look at the technical aspects for the ongoing project, as well as the development of the new Polaroid film. When asked how the best way to show support for the project, Florian Kaps replied, “We need storytellers, people who find history exciting and would like to share it with others. We find Polaroid’s story to be very exciting indeed, and during this special report we will show you how the impossible in photography, became possible.”