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Bert on the Street 4

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Runtime - length of the film: 07m37s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

In the first three parts of our street photography series with Bert Stephani we have learned a lot about photographic techniques, styles and attitudes. In this degree, Bert is concerned about the topic of overstimulation:
 
Equipped with all the knowledge and skills the photographer goes into the streets of the city and realizes that there are lots of impressions and possibilities. This can quickly become too much for him and overwhelm his perception, which in the worst case falls into the tunnel vision mode and no longer recognizes the valuable opportunities for really good pictures.
 
To prevent this Bert has a self-proven method: It is good to focus on a particular keyword or a superordinate topic, and to use this perceptual steering to recognize what is appropriate and to ignore the unimportant. In this way, the photographer remains so relaxed that he suddenly also has opportunities for images that do not directly have something to do with the focused object.

Bert on the Street 3

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m10s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

In this third part of his street photography series Bert Stephani takes us to two photographic attitudes - the reactive and proactive photography.
 
Bert explains their differences as well as their advantages and disadvantages. Then, armed with his Fujifilm X70 compact camera on which a GoPro is stuck, he makes his way through Dinant 's streets to combine reactive and proactive street photography: He looks out for suitable scenes and while walking he photographs his impressions of the city.
 
Finally, he shows two well-done pictures from streets far away from Belgium. These examples show once again that reactive and proactive photography have their own appeal and how they can be combined in particularly lucky moments.

Tod Papageorge

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m33s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Lucien Clergue

Summary:

In the early 1960s Tod Papageorge began to photograph. Throughout that decade he significantly shaped the street photography in New York and collaborated with Garry Winogrand, Joel Meyerowitz and John Szarkowski. 1970 and 1977 he got Guggenheim Fellowships in order to devote himself entirely to his photographic work. Since 1979 he has been professor at Yale University, where he directs the course of studies for graduates in photography.

In our FotoTV. interview speaks about his beginnings as photographer and how an exhibition of the artist Brassaï lead him from 35mm to middle format photography. Papageorge talks about his series Central Park and Studio 54 und shows some pictures of his recent work.

Several times in the video he uses the phrase "clear picture": For him clearness is the most important aspect in photography.

Michele Borzoni

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m13s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Michele Borzoni is an Italian photojournalist. He has been to Nepal, Kashmir and did stories about his homeland.

In 2006 he founded TerraProject to collaborate with photographers. Borzoni covers subjects ranging from social to documentary. He provides insight into strange cultures and past times, for which he travels the world.

A review on his work shows his fascination for the medium.

Mary Ellen Mark

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Runtime - length of the film: 12m58s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

This video is about a quite remarkable woman. Mary Ellen Mark has been a photographer for over forty years and the ‘Bio & Resume’ section on her homepage documents an extraordinary lifetime’s work:
 
120 solo exhibitions, 175 group exhibitions, 58 collections in which she is permanently exhibited, 5 film credits, 59 photographic awards, 229 teaching and lecturing jobs, 132 different magazines have published her photographs, 17 books have been authored by her alone and 177 books have been published with her as coauthor.

Having majored in painting and art history she got a scholarship to study photojournalism at the excellent Annenberg School for Communication in Pennsylvania. Here it was possible to borrow any kind of photographic equipment one might want and to have all the paper you needed to print the results – “a fantastic experience”. Mary still uses various formats, each with it’s own particular feel. And she has stayed true to her photojournalistic roots, photographing people and using film rather than digital.

To those of her students who use digital, she recommends that they tape up the backs of their cameras. It is only possible to judge if an image works, she insists, when it’s printed, not directly on the screen of the camera. Most of what is now produced in computers changes the reality of what you are seeing, she says. It is photo-illustration, not photography.

The business of photography has changed over the years and Mary sees some of changes critically. There is now less interest in long stories and less respect for documentary work, for reality and for great portraiture. Potent, iconic images are what Mary Ellen Mark creates and these images, in her words, “have to be made in the camera”. “You have to find the picture and that’s the way it is.” Your job is to translate what you are looking at into an image.

On the technical side, Mary says that she almost always uses Tri-X. And in shooting situations she says, “you have to take control. The subjects must feel that you know what you’re doing.”

Mary Ellen Mark is as active as ever and describes here some of her current projects and the workshop that she will be running this year for the fifteenth time in Mexico.

Her words of wisdom are based on enormous photographic experience and a lifetime of work with people: “Don’t be pushed into being what you’re not”.

Ernesto Bazan 2

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Runtime - length of the film: 09m26s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Ernesto Bazan 1

Summary:

The second part of Ernesto Bazan’s incredible interview with FotoTV focuses on his workshop teachings and his photographic book. Bazan had been working as an editorial photographer for many years from assignments from magazines doing mainly travel stories. But in 2002 after 20 years of doing the same thing he became bored with the assignments. 

Soon another revelation came to him one night and urged him to be a workshop teacher of photography. He has no idea how he was going to be a good teacher and his first student was the one who helped him put together a website. Eight students show up to his first workshop. He taught them about framing and composition and he slowly started to give up commercial photography altogether, now only doing workshops in Latin America. There were two great gifts Bazan received doing workshops: Helping his students become better photographers and the incredible gift of now being able to do his own personal work.

The workshop definitely changed his life and in 2006 he was summoned to the police station in Havana and accused by an immigration official of teaching journalistic photography. Bazan denied this and stated he was après photographer but he was teaching a photography workshop. The official then threatened his family in Cuba so Bazan had to leave with his family escaping to Mexico. At this point he realized it was time for him to do a book on his photographic life of 14 years of his work, so he asked his students to help him edit his book so a publishing company would not ruin his perspective or story he wanted to tell. After making a dummy version of the book he then asked his students to critique the book. It was the very same 50 students who helped him edit and critique his book who received the first 50 limited edition silver gelatin print books. This helped him finance the book and he feels proud that the book was created with the help of his students.

Please feel free to view the special YouTube video presentation after this video, which was created especially for this segment.

Ernesto Bazan 1

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m27s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Ernesto Bazan 2

Summary:

In this first part of Ernest Bazan's photography, Bazan focuses on the emotional attachment to his photography and the meaning behind his images. The transition from professional photographer to an intimate picture taker is how Bazan describes himself on a 'Photographic Revelation". One of the most relevant project Bazan discuses with much feeling is his first published book on Cuba. He arrived in Cuba in 1992 and that forever changed his life and the path of his career. He met his future wife, who bore two twin boys and after that moment Bazan knew that he would always have a deep and emotional connection to Cuba, forever. It's quite interesting how Bazan came to be a photographer.

Through a dream he heard a distinct voice tell him to be a photographer. Upon waking the next day he set out to follow that dream much to the dismay to his parents, especially his father who had another career choice in mind. Bazan then set off to learn English in order to study in New York at the School of Visual Arts in 1979. Four years later he graduated. Soon he made his first trip to Cuba based on the notion that Cuba was like the thought of an exotic woman he could not get out of his thoughts. With these motivations he booked his first week package tour and was mesmerized the moment he stepped of the plane. The similarities between the daily street life in Palermo and Cuba were stunningly uncanny, which made him feel right at home, comfortable and ready to shoot. Well, it was on his second trip to Cuba where his worked started to change more towards to an intimate subject approach. With the marriage to his wife and birth of his twin boys he started to incorporate his family into the stories and picture book on Cuba.

One picture that made it into the book, he describes as the "Quintessence" of motherhood, is of his wife feeding her children with a milk bottle and disheveled hair, giving motherly care without even thinking about her vanity. Bazan becomes friends with most of his subjects, like the farmers he met on the countryside. It became a more personal journey and a way to feel more through shooting people who would otherwise not even make the daily news. Bazan is not interested in shooting war or tragedy; he is more interested in photographing the poetry of life, everyday occurrences that we are all not so privileged to see.

And we are thankful that Bazan shares his thoughtful and poignant work with an average to eclectic audience that would otherwise be to jaded by the media world of photography to take time out for the beautiful simple things in life, or otherwise not have the means to research or purchase his books or work. Through the Internet Bazan makes a lot of his work available for the pleasurable viewing of others.

Bazan has also won several admirable photographic awards throughout his career, which shows no signs of slowing down. Please take a look at Ernesto Bazan Part 2 to be released her on FotoTV.com

Create a Movie Scene

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Runtime - length of the film: 6m23s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this video Kate Breuer shows, how to create a cinematic effect, that makes your pictures look like they were taken out of a movie.

She adds a hue/saturation adjustment layer to create the brown-golden color typical for movies and to add some contrast and satuartion.

In the next step, she adds some black bars at the top and bottom to make the viewer think of 16:9 movies at television.

Finally, she draws in some back lighting by painting with a white, smooth brush on a new layer.

Learn how to make your own images look like cinematic art!

Richard Kalvar on the Streets

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Runtime - length of the film: 25m31s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Richard Kalvar

Summary:

FotoTV has developed FotoTV-Tech, a forum within the FotoTV platform dedicated to covering all photography related topics such as, prominent photographers, camera hardware, software services and products. For this further installment of FotoTV Tech founder Marc Ludwig speaks with legendary Magnum photographer, Richard Kalvar to discuss his work and technique.

Kalvar, a member of Magnum since the 1970’s, is a classic, black & white street photographer uses Kodak tri-x film, “for the unbelievable grain and rich grey tones”, he boasts. Although he considers the term “street-photography” to be anywhere from a bar or restaurant, to a visit to someone’s house, his photographs always reveal an intimate and most likely, a humorous setting.

Kalvar has an exceptional eye and a talent for catching unexpected moments between human interactions, be it two people arguing or talking on the street or two grown men dressed as daisies. He shares numerous techniques and gives guidelines on how photographers can best make themselves “invisible” when photographing on the street. One interesting story Kalvar shares is that of being accosted on the street during shooting for FotoTV and he also gives valuable tips on how photographers can make the best of almost any situation. Kalvar also talks about his latest project “Earthlings”, a photo book that showcases the best of his work throughout his extensive career.