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W.M. Hunt

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Runtime - length of the film: 16m03s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Photography collector W.M. Hunt tells how he got into collecting and how his enthusiasm increased over time. He desribes the inception of his archive up to a key moment, when he considered his collection to be complete.

Remarkable is his affinity to pictures that include concealed faces.

photokinaTV - Social Media Networking

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Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

The Instagram Network is a popular platform for sharing pictures with other people.

Photographer Mike Larson shows his way of using Intagram in order to push his business and to acquire new customers.

photokinaTV - Specializing 1

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Language: english
Skill level:
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photokinaTV - Mike Larson

Summary:

Photography is a highly competetive business. Mike Larson gives advices for photographers, how to grow your business and to leave the competitors behind. He recommends specializing in a certain photographic topic and to develop an individual picturestyle.

TED Talk 2012

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Runtime - length of the film: 6m39s
Language: english
Skill level:
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JR

Summary:

"Can art change the world?" - That's the question JR talks about at TED, one year after the beginning of the INSIDE OUT project.

"I wish for yout to stand up for what you care about by participating in a global art project, and together we'll turn the world... INSIDE OUT". - JR

INSIDE OUT is a large-scale participatory art project that transforms messages of personal identity into pieces of artistic work. Everyone is challenged to use black and white photographic portraits to discover, reveal and share the untold stories and images of people around the world. These digitally uploaded images will be made into posters and sent back to the project’s co-creators for them to exhibit in their own communities. People can participate as an individual or in a group; posters can be placed anywhere, from a solitary image in an office window to a wall of portraits on an abandoned building or a full stadium. These exhibitions will be documented, archived and viewable virtually.

(The text above is taken from the website www.insideoutproject.net.)

Now, one year after beginning, JR sums up the project and it's development so far: 100.000 posters have been printed this year!

Henry Wessel

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Runtime - length of the film: 19m55s
Skill level:
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Summary:

Henry Wessel discusses with FotoTV how he came upon photography and taking photographs while on the road and we learn how his work has become an important part of photographic history. It was his girlfriend who provided Wessel the opportunity to become a photographer after she gave him a Leica Camera. It was not long after taking his first photos and experimenting in the darkroom was he hooked.

Even though he knew very little about photography at the time it fascinated him and soon after opened a natural light portrait studio with his girlfriend, which they operated for one year before hitchhiking across America for seven years. During those years Wessel racked up an outstanding 34 trips back and forth, across the United States. It was the American west and south west that ignited his photographic passion. Wessel’s method generally was to go out and photograph a myriad of subjects without a plan. He says “It is the unpredictable things that turn up in the photo aside from the main action. Those elements give photos an authenticity, giving it power."

What drew Wessel to the world of photography was simply the physical world itself and all its glorious intricacies. That is what interested him initially, and it still keeps him motivated today. Wessel, who is one of California's most respected artists, is able to articulate his philosophy in a concise visual sense, and his unique and unforgettable images give us much to discover about his world and how he sees it. In the past he worked mostly in black and white using a manual camera, printing hundreds of contact sheets each year only to archive them in his studio.

Years later, he still continues to sort through them, discovering a certain moment in time which represents what he experienced, what he was thinking and feeling while taking the picture. Since photography is a visual recording instrument, Wessel's distinctive images of landscape, architecture and people can best be interpreted at best, documentary in style, but at the same time the approach has always coexisted within Wessel, inspiring his incisive personal perspective.

Unseen

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Runtime - length of the film: 15m06s
Skill level:
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Elliott Erwitt

Summary:

In this film, “Unseen” we visit photographer and filmmaker Elliott Erwitt during his exhibition at the “Flo Peters Gallery” in Hamburg, Germany. Erwitt takes us on a visually stimulating journey through time as he walks and talks us through the gallery, commenting on several pieces of his finest work. He eclectically shares with us a humanistic, witty, and personal side of himself that enthralls, surprises, and entertains. Erwitt discuss in detail some of his early advertising work and divulges a little trick he used that can actually be seen in an end shot. In addition, Erwitt shows us other “once in a lifetime moment” photos, like the funeral of John F. Kennedy and the photograph of JFK’s grieving widow Jackie Kennedy. Other images stand out due to their placement, just as Erwitt himself stands out in this interview. He wears a plastic “sunny-side up” egg pinned to his lapel, which therefore, one might think he is a comedian or an odd fellow. But it’s exactly this transcending quirkiness that makes us so fond of Erwitt and his work. He himself says in this interview, “a picture is worth a thousand words” and the plastic egg on his lapel befits this phrase absolutely. He goes on to show us his shootings with Marilyn Monroe, pointing out that he placed her portrait next to a portrait of a dog in the gallery. Was there a connection to be discovered? No, it’s just simply that Erwitt is the opposite of mundane and has a multifarious approach to his work, and it is this approach that holds our interest at apex levels. Erwitt third book, “Unseen”, hence the movie title, is a book of rediscovered, overlooked, and never before seen photos from his archives. He describes the process in making the book as depressing and interesting; depressing because he comes across old mistakes he made in photography, and interesting because he comes across rare gems of unusual photos, some more than fifty years old. Erwitt was born in Paris in 1928 to Russian parents. In 1939 he emigrated to the United States, together with his family. And as a teenager living in Hollywood, he discovered his interest in photography while working in a commercial darkroom before taking photography classes at Los Angeles City College. In 1948 he moved to New York and began studying film at the New School for Social Research. In 1953 Erwitt joined Magnum Photos and worked as a freelance photographer and in the late 1960s he served as Magnum's president for three years. Erwitt became known for kind irony, and for a well-proportioned sensibility, which was traditional to the spirit of Magnum. In the 1970s he then turned to film. At first documentaries, then in the 1980s he produced eighteen comedy films for Home Box Office, (HBO) in the United States. Erwitt’s work is centered primarily on the observation of people, his pictures capturing life's most intense moments. One of the most accomplished photographers of his generation, Erwitt describes himself as a professional photographer by trade and an amateur photographer by vocation. What led to his fame and longevity can be accredited to a single image and being at the right place at the right time; the kitchen debate photograph, taken in 1959 of Krushchev and Nixon arguing and grandstanding in front of a refrigerator. With his signature style and wit, his images tell the viewers, stories of the famous and the ordinary, the strange and the prosaic. He was quoted having said, “It's about reacting to what you see, hopefully without preconception. You can find pictures anywhere. It's simply a matter of noticing things and organizing them. You just have to care about what's around you and have a concern with humanity and the human comedy."