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John G. Morris

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Runtime - length of the film: 16m44s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this interview, taken at the Les Recontres D'Arles photo festival in southern France, photo editor John G. Morris talks about his career and his friend Robert Capa. During the second world war, Morris was photo editor for the New York Times and Life magazine.

John G. Morris impressively describes how he developed the desire to pursue a journalistic career and how the famous war photographer Robert Capa became his companion and best friend.

John G. Morris died at the age of 100 on July 28, 2017 in Paris.

Note: Unfortunately, we could only get the image rights for a single photograph of Robert Capa. Nevertheless, we would not like to keep you from this interesting interview. Numerous works by Robert Capa can be found on the Internet.

Paolo Pellegrin

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m42s
Language: english
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Summary:

Paolo Pellegrin is an Italian photojournalist and member of Magnum Photos. He spent many years in war zones of the Middle East.

Beside the local conditions, getting to the regions and gaining permission to cover situations is just as much of an issue. He went to refugee camps in Sudan and the 2006 Lebanon War, in which he witnessed death while risking his very own life.

His photograph of a dying victim won the 2006 World Press Photo Award.

Based on A True Story

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Runtime - length of the film: 14m50s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this FotoTV interview, famed photographer David Alan Harvey talks about his early beginnings in photography. He is known for his charismatic images, often exploring subjects such as poverty, urban life, and cross culture.

Early on as a child during a hospital stay he spent much of his time reading, Life Magazine in particular. Even though he was only eight years old he had gotten his first camera, but it wasn't until he was 12 years old on a camping trip did he realize that he wanted to take photos himself.

At age 21 he had a job working on the beach and he was enjoying his time surfing and partying. It was at this time he decided to venture out away from the beach to where he was drawn into the culture of black people who lived across the tracks from the beach, which was actually the beginning of his working on his first documentary "Tell it like it is".

Harvey goes on to share stories of his close work with cultures such as criminals, wealthy individuals, drug dealers and police officer. His book project, "Based on a True story was a subtitle of "One night in Rio" Where he successfully penetrated every social group living there at the time.

 

Steve McCurry

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Runtime - length of the film: 18m03s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Photographer, Steve McCurry might be most famous for his mysterious and arrestingly beautiful photograph, "The Afghan Girl", but his entire collection of work is so much profound.

In this interview McCurry reflects on his photography and speaks with FotoTV about his unique experiences and stories behind his iconic work. McCurry’s first trip abroad as a photographer was to India. Shortly after he took a trip to Afghanistan during the early days of insurgency and revolution, which was the turning point of his career. Always fascinated with meeting new people and discovering new countries and cultures, McCurry began to pitch his own ideas for stories to magazine editors. Those ideas were always simple, to take meaningful photos of situations and things that were moving and inspiring, merely his response to the world surrounding him. Human behavior seems to be the element always present in McCurry’s images, the human face and its expressions and how people differ from culture to culture.

Currently working on a long-term project on Buddhism, he travels back to India at least once a year to visit the country and people he has come to love and understand, each time discovering something unknown and cherishing every moment of new experience. Throughout his career he has collected a vast amount of vivid portraits and photographs reflecting the daily lives of people and their cultures around the world and assembled them in a book project entitled "Portraits". With so much success and international accolades he remains humble and grateful to be able to share his work with people, and to be aware of what it means to live on this planet.

Marc Riboud

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Runtime - length of the film: 14m41s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Marc Riboud is a living legend, a star Magnum photographer. A man who, in the Paris of 1951, met three of the founders of that illustrious photo-cooperative, Henri Cartier Bresson, Robert Capa and David Seymour. In this video you meet a man who at 88 is unassuming, wise, and still passionate about photography.

He hasn't switched to digital photography. Riboud likens the handling of his camera to that of a concert pianist with his piano. The pianist knows where every key is without looking or even having to think about it. Practicing for five or six hours a day, the positions of the notes become instinctive. He can concentrate on the music. And so it is for Marc Riboud with his film camera. You can't, and shouldn't try to, teach an old dog new tricks.

Like Bresson, Riboud has an uncanny ability to capture striking images of fleeting moments. Moments that betray intimate thoughts and feelings that stunningly or funnily freeze an everyday instant that would otherwise pass unnoticed, moments that express in powerful compositions the realities of war and political change.

This interview with Marc Riboud is spiced with some of his most remarkable photos and his comments on them: The man with no safety line painting the Eifel Tower, the girl with a flower facing soldiers with bayonets outside the White House, and many more.

In 1957, Marc Riboud was one of the first European photographers to go to China during the years of the Cultural Revolution and meet Chairman Mao. He reported on the Vietnam War from the North and the South. Later he travelled widely, though concentrating much on Asia.

The list of people he has photographed runs from Abbé Pierre to Lech Wallensa, from Max Ernst to Mitterand, from the Beatles to Simone de Beavoir.

"Rather than a profession, photography has always been a passion for me, a passion closer to an obsession."  From the title page of Marc Riboud's website.

Richard Kalvar on the Streets

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Runtime - length of the film: 25m31s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Richard Kalvar

Summary:

FotoTV has developed FotoTV-Tech, a forum within the FotoTV platform dedicated to covering all photography related topics such as, prominent photographers, camera hardware, software services and products. For this further installment of FotoTV Tech founder Marc Ludwig speaks with legendary Magnum photographer, Richard Kalvar to discuss his work and technique.

Kalvar, a member of Magnum since the 1970’s, is a classic, black & white street photographer uses Kodak tri-x film, “for the unbelievable grain and rich grey tones”, he boasts. Although he considers the term “street-photography” to be anywhere from a bar or restaurant, to a visit to someone’s house, his photographs always reveal an intimate and most likely, a humorous setting.

Kalvar has an exceptional eye and a talent for catching unexpected moments between human interactions, be it two people arguing or talking on the street or two grown men dressed as daisies. He shares numerous techniques and gives guidelines on how photographers can best make themselves “invisible” when photographing on the street. One interesting story Kalvar shares is that of being accosted on the street during shooting for FotoTV and he also gives valuable tips on how photographers can make the best of almost any situation. Kalvar also talks about his latest project “Earthlings”, a photo book that showcases the best of his work throughout his extensive career.

Jim Goldberg

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Runtime - length of the film: 12m12s
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Summary:

In this interview with FotoTV, documentary photographer Jim Goldberg talks about his early career, as well as his latest book and exhibition project entitled “Open See”, a multi-media exhibit displayed at the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation in Paris, France.

Goldberg also discusses what his plans for the future are and shares some interesting facts about several of his earlier works including, “Rich and Poor”, Raised by Wolves”, “Hospice”, and “Nursing Home”.

Open See was a project that took over six years to complete and is a photographic documentation of the lives and experiences of illegal immigrants, refugees, displaced people and asylum seekers who are trying to make new beginnings and a better future in Europe. In particular Goldberg has focused on Greece, since illegal workers and immigrants make up about twenty percent of the population.

It is clear that Goldberg has a desire to make a difference in the world today, and it is through his humane photographs that he wishes to inform the viewer, expose social injustice and therefore, encourage change. His subjects reveal where they are now in life and other relevant personal facts and information by writing over Polaroid’s, which Goldberg has shot, and provided to them, creating a personal connection with a real person, not just another photograph of a nameless subject.

Although his passion is documentary work, Goldberg’s eclectic strategy is to use as many mediums as possible to create a diverse palette of information. Immigration issues in Europe in general are very complex and by creating poetic and metaphorical situations, his photographs seem to simplify the unknown and raise questions, engaging the heart and mind, giving a sense of underlying hope for the many displaced individuals.

Paul Fusco

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Runtime - length of the film: 18m15s
Language: english
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Summary:

Magnum photographer Paul Fusco discusses the inspiration and motivation behind beginning his career and shares agonizing personal stories, as well as images from his heart-wrenching photo essay "Chernobyl Legacy", a series of piercing photographs of intimate and haunting portraits and the terrible loss of human life surrounding the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in 1986--an abominable incident that should never be forgotten.

Fusco's Chernobyl Legacy bears witness to the present-day effects of the horrific nuclear accident that took place in the Ukraine in 1986. More than fifteen years following the disaster, his consuming images document the effects of this tragedy and the lives of the people afflicted by Chernobyl.

Fusco's photographs are insightful and sad, and an incredible documentation of an accident that the world seems to have forgotten. The photographs demonstrate how dangerous nuclear power is and what the real consequences of a nuclear accident are.

Eli Reed

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Runtime - length of the film: 15m54s
Language: english
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Summary:

In this film, acclaimed photojournalist Eli Reed, Reed, the first black photographer for Magnum, reflects on his early beginnings as a photographer and discusses his poignant work. Documenting his mother in front of the Christmas tree, Reed took his first photograph at age ten. After his mother passed away two years later, the photo became a visual memento he frequently reminisced throughout the years. As Reed shares, “It was not until the photos of Magnum Agency caught my eye did I consider being a professional photographer.” Since Magnum photographers were known for their great sense of composition and attention to detail, Reed could relate to the photos he saw, he describes the photos as being both real and artistic. Reed’s provocative photographs of people and events are portrayed with emotion and sensitivity. While on a photo essay assignment, he documents the story of a small family by getting close to his subjects, underlining the emotional connection between the individuals. Not only does Reed tell an amazing story with his photos, each scene framed by a great sense of composition, it is his incredible insight and true sense empathy for the people he sees through his lens that tells us much more about the photographer and his subjects. Reed notes, “Of deep heartfelt and personal value is my book project ‘“Black in America”’, a succession of photographs documenting the broader picture of black life in America, embedded into an historical context. With his photographs, Reed does not merely want document a moment in time, but more so, make someone want to “go there”.

Harry Gruyaert

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Runtime - length of the film: 13m28s
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Summary:

In this film, photographer, Harry Gruyaert sits down with FotoTV and reflects on his life, career highlights and his priorities as a photojournalist. Starting out in fashion, Gruyaert soon realized that he was more inclined to landscapes and people, rather than photographing the latest styles. He was absolutely enthralled by the locations he visited and fell in love with Morocco after his first trip there. His trip to Morocco was personal and professional success, where he produced intense photographs of light, color, objects, people and situations depicting an undisturbed, beautiful scene of life. Visions of pure landscapes and daily life saturated with rich and colorful surroundings. For his first serious body of work, Gruyaert made photographs of distorted TV images, covering current events such as the 1972 Munich Olympics to produce a vibrant caricature of the new stories. He explains, “I had a television set that didn't work properly; as my assistant and I moved the antenna, fiddling with the switches, it was possible to obtain fascinating colors. At the time, of course, the video recorder didn't exist, not to mention the freeze frame. So I set my camera to 1/8 sec and f4.0, held my camera steady and sometimes moved very close to the screen to frame it differently.” At the heart of Gruyaert’s work is his affinity to structuring the intense nature of color. His images are beautiful in terms of life, luminosity and the people in relation to their situations. A contrast of elements assembled into refined graphics of shadows, hue, light and atmosphere. Gruyaert studied at the School for Photo and Cinema in Brussels from 1959 to 1962. He then began freelance fashion and advertising work in Paris, while working as a director of photography for Flemish television.