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Adam Fuss 1

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Runtime - length of the film: 14m10s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Adam Fuss 2

Summary:

Adam Fuss was born in 1961 in England.
 
After his father died early, Adam lived with his mother in Australia until the age of twelve. When he was 19, he returned there and did an apprenticeship as a photographer. Since moving to New York later, he has gained an international reputation with unusual themes and compositions.
 
In recent decades, Fuss has created images of babies in the water, drops of water, christening gowns, snakes, rabbit guts and human skulls. For his very early work, he used a pinhole camera, which gave him the idea of using no camera at all and making daguerreotypes and photograms.
 
In the first part of our two-part interview with him, he focuses on his pictures of snakes and the complex symbolism inherent in a snake.

Pinholes and Projections

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Runtime - length of the film: 09m15s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this film three different artists present us with their Pinhole and Projection work from Arlés.

A few years ago the duo stenop.es began taking pictures in India using the Camera Obscura principle, by projecting the outside world onto indoor walls. They finished further work in Paris that also show pictures and films projected onto indoor walls.

In addition to stenop.es, the artist Clément Briend presents us with projections made in cities, apartments and on various objects that he made with the help of a modified torch.

A special project of his shows us projections from Buddha onto trees in Cambodia.

The Digital Pinhole Photography II

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Runtime - length of the film: 17m22s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Martin Timm is back with part two in his series on digital pinhole photography. Here he has gathered all the necessary ingredients to cook up a pinhole adapter that can fit any digital SLR.

The techniques used to construct it is right out of your grade school handicraft's hour. This amazingly simple approach using toilet paper rolls, tin foil, rubber bands glue etc is carefully explained. The result: a ready to use handy-dandy pinhole attachment for your digital camera that's ready to use.

So now it's time to get your feet wet..literally. Martin takes it outside and gives a hands-on demonstration using the pinhole adapter to compose a great picture, demonstrating it works too. So check it out!

The Digital Pinhole Photography I

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Runtime - length of the film: 15m53s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

This time we're jumping back to the origins of photography. We're talking about pinhole photography. Martin Timm shows us in this film that pinhole photography doesn't have to be a relic of the past. That even a seemingly modern digital SLR can be transformed into the very simple pinhole box camera with little effort or cost. 
 
In this first of a two part series Martin takes us through his passion for this pinhole medium giving us the basics of what makes pinhole photography possible. He defines the simple physics of what happens with a pinhole box and then shows us how it can be applied using modern digital equipment.
 
The simple charm of pin-hole photography can be exploited to great effect with the application of a few of these principles. The mildly soft edges combine with the unique perspective angles to create dream like images and abstractions that can be applied in all photographic styles; Landscape ,Portraits, or Abstract. 
 
We also get to see how Martin has applied these principles to a D-SLR in a Rolls-Royce version incorporating macro extension rings and a compendium bellows, using a punctured soda can for the aperture. In the second film we will see how to apply these principles and build an even lower cost variant to create our own pinhole images.

A Big One

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Runtime - length of the film: 7m40s
Skill level:
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E. O. Hoppé

Summary:

In this film, Graham Howe, founder, CEO and Director of Curatorial Assistance tells us a an amazing story of six men who had a colossal idea, who put their minds to it and said they could do it, and they did it. This is idea was to build the world’s largest camera and consequently produce the world’s largest photograph.

To the six photographers involved, Jerry Burchfield, Mark Chamberlain, Jacques Garnier, Rob Johnson, Douglas McCulloh and Clayton Spada, the undertaking is part of something bigger than just a really huge picture. A team of six artists of the Legacy Project and an small army of assistants and volunteers converted an abandoned F-18 jet fighter hanger at El Toro MCAS in Orange County, California into a gigantic pinhole camera, then hung a single, seamless piece of light sensitive muslin cloth from the ceiling of the hanger.

Spada presented the idea at a monthly meeting, and the photographers decided, “Let’s go for it!” And so was born The Great Picture project. From 2004 to 2006 the group negotiated with local governments and with the U.S. Government for permission to use an abandoned F-18 fighter jet hanger as a gigantic pinhole camera to produce the world’s largest photograph taken by the world’s largest camera.

The photo was created using the centuries-old principle of "camera obscura" after a gumball-size hole was opened in the hangar's wall, allowing a tiny beam of light to enter. On July 8, 2006, after months of light-tightening the hanger, Building 115, the Legacy Project took the plunge. They would have only one chance to do the job right, so they exposed test strips over the course of several days before deciding on an exposure time of 35 minutes through an aperture of 6 mm (approximately 1/4”) onto a single seamless piece of hand-coated light sensitive muslin that was custom made in Germany.

It was then covered in 20 gallons of light-sensitive emulsion and became the photographic "negative." Howe recalls seeing the fuzzy, 28-by-108 foot black-and-white image.  The photograph shows a dilapidated air traffic control tower, an overgrown runway and palm trees clustered amid rolling hills. Curatorial Assistance is an arts organization that creates and tours art exhibitions that travel to museums worldwide. Curatorial Assistance also publishes art catalogues and books with particular focus on the photographic arts. Graham Howe is also an author, curator, and artist.