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Pieter Hugo

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Runtime - length of the film: 7m10s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Pieter Hugo is a photographer from South Africa. In his works such as "The Hyena Men", "Permanent Error" or "Kin" he deals with the various faces of his homeland. In about 10 years Hugo has created a considerable body of work that shows the complexity and contradictions of society.
 
In this FotoTV. interview he talks about his photographic journey that started at the age of 12. His training was done purely practical in the form of contract work as a photojournalist. The barriers of rhythm und visual language in photojournalism however led him into an independent, more artistic career.

Creative Shooting

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Runtime - length of the film: 13m26s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

In this FotoTV. shooting Bert Stephani shows his own way to grow as a photographer. He developed a training that he does several times a month.

Under a limitation of equipment and time he challenges himself in unknown locations. He improvises and flows from one idea to the next. His aim is to get the best possible pictures. That beefs up the artistic sense and stimulates the creative craft.

Today Bert's training takes place in a hotel room. Again his sparring partner is model Swetlana.

Renaissance Look

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Runtime - length of the film: 16m45s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Rüdiger Schestag created a German series of videos explaining how to create an antique painted look from your photos. Kate Breuer recorded the Photoshop part in English.

In this tutorial she uses the photograph Rüdiger Schestag used in the German version and follows his steps, explaining which steps are necessary to make your photos look like they were on old canvas. She explains how to get rid of flying hair and skin flaws and how to optimize the mood of the photograph. In addition, she explains how to add lights, shadows and structure. At the end of those steps the result is a wonderful Renaissance Portrait.

Between Rock and Jazz

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Runtime - length of the film: 12m11s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Photographer Lisa Tanner sits down with FotoTV to discuss the early beginnings of her career and her many incredible experiences as a staff photographer and publicist with Atlantic Records that provided her the chance to meet, interview and photograph living legends. Tanner also shares some of her iconic images from her immense photographic archives.

Tanner started photography at a very early age, largely in part due to her award winning photographer father, Lee Tanner. Jazz and Rock music have been a part of Tanner's life as long as she can remember, so has the musicians way of life, so attending concerts and music events her father was photographing came naturally to her. Branching off on her own, Tanner got her professional start as a rock photographer shooting some of the world's most talented and recognized artists for Atlantic Records, a time when the record label was at the pinnacle of the indutry. Starting out at an early age did have its disadvantages though. At age 17 she was competing with older, much more experienced photographers. But Tanner remained steadfast and determined to succeed. One thing that did help her out was being able to shoot an unlimited amount of material, which enabled her to improve and perfect her style.

Currently she is shooting more Jazz musicians as opposed to her early career and it is something she likes very much because of the camaraderie between the musicians and the much-welcomed absence of egos. Unlike the atmosphere surrounding rock stars, Tanner finds the Jazz musicians much more laid back and open to sharing their music with their peers. To Tanner it is all about creating a moment with her photography out of what the musicians are doing at the moment. She masterfully documents slices of time, her images giving eternal life to a wonderful music profession.

Paul Solberg

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Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

You might think that everything has been said about photographing flowers. You'd be wrong. Paul Solberg transforms botany into something you've never seen before: He takes you into a world of ethereal, translucent life forms. In this video he discusses the works presented in his exhibition at the Flo Peters Gallery in Hamburg.

Doing something new with flowers is challenging to say the least. The subject is dripping with sugar-sweet clichés: Valentine's Day, Weddings, romance and so on. But Solberg neither lives with flowers nor does he particularly like flower arrangements. There is no deep message in these images. It would, he says, be pretentious to claim so. He sees the flowers he photographs rather as jewellery that he makes portraits of. Robert Mapplethorpe's flowers were portraits too, but they are dark, sculptural images, almost like marble, laden with erotic innuendo.

Paul Solberg's images are stunning, light, almost abstract images of individual flowers, back-lit against white backgrounds.

Most of the work was done in the studio using a large array of small lights. Some shots were taken outdoors against the light. 'Light' is a word he uses repeatedly in talking about these pictures. " Colour is not the first thing that draws me in: It's the light". And on the subject of monochrome vs. Colour: " Black & white or colour is very secondary". 'Secondary' is the word he uses too about cameras: "They are beautiful machines, but it doesn't matter while I'm working. The most nimble and easy to use is what I use."

Paul was born in Minnesota in 1969, studied anthropology and photography in Cape Town, South Africa, andbecame a professional photographer quite late at the age of 35. There are echoes of Andy Warhol when he maintains," You don't have to make living at photography to be a photographer. You can't really teach photography. We're all photographers."

On his motivation in photography he says, "There's always a craving to do more. It's a process of slowing down and concentrating on one subject. Photography keeps me hungry, wonderfully ill at ease!"

Solberg lives in New York City.

A PDF version of Paul Solberg's book 'Bloom' is available free here.