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Larry Towell

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m26s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

Larry Towell is a photographer and also operates as a musician and storyteller. He lives with his family on a farm in Canada. He was the first Canadian member of Magnum. Since the mid-80s photography is his source of livelihood.
 
Through the for him very impressive time as a volunteer helper in India in the mid-70s his work is characterized by the gap between rich and poor. Main subject in almost all works are the "landless people" which means the rural population without land.
 
Towells first projects in which this motif already took place originated in Central America and dealt among others with the Counterrevolutionaries in Nicaragua, the civil War in El Salvador and the "Disappeared" in Guatemala. He later documented the Mennonites in Mexico and even his own family in Canada.
 
After he was a strong defender of the black and white film his recent works have given way to the changing times. In those younger works there are color photos als well as multimedia influences such as video or music.

John G. Morris

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Runtime - length of the film: 16m44s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this interview, taken at the Les Recontres D'Arles photo festival in southern France, photo editor John G. Morris talks about his career and his friend Robert Capa. During the second world war, Morris was photo editor for the New York Times and Life magazine.

John G. Morris impressively describes how he developed the desire to pursue a journalistic career and how the famous war photographer Robert Capa became his companion and best friend.

John G. Morris died at the age of 100 on July 28, 2017 in Paris.

Note: Unfortunately, we could only get the image rights for a single photograph of Robert Capa. Nevertheless, we would not like to keep you from this interesting interview. Numerous works by Robert Capa can be found on the Internet.

Susan Meiselas

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Runtime - length of the film: 12m54s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

American Magnum photographer Susan Meiselas guides through her exhibition "Carrying the Past, Forward".
 
Meiselas is known for her visual storytelling in documentary style. Her photographs are often mixed with other media, for example interviews or handmade books. She has received numerous awards for her artistic work.
 
"Carrying the Past, Forward" deals with the issue of migration in the 70s, 80s and 90s. In her major works "Crossings" and "Kurdistan: In the Shadow of History", which are combined in the exhibition, Meiselas inspects the movement of refugees in Central America and the Middle East. She illuminates the individual lives of those who had to leave their homes and lost their loved ones due to political circumstances.
 
In the face of today's current affairs Susan's works are as topical as ever. They happened in other places and by different causes, but the needs of the people are exactly the same.

Michele Borzoni

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m13s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Michele Borzoni is an Italian photojournalist. He has been to Nepal, Kashmir and did stories about his homeland.

In 2006 he founded TerraProject to collaborate with photographers. Borzoni covers subjects ranging from social to documentary. He provides insight into strange cultures and past times, for which he travels the world.

A review on his work shows his fascination for the medium.

Bill Perlmutter

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Runtime - length of the film: 12m40s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Bill Perlmutter was born in 1932, he lives and works in New York.

After his photography studies he worked as a press photographer for the U.S. Army in Germany. In his spare time he photographed places and scenes in Germany, France, Italy, Portugal and Spain. His photographs reflect the European post-war period, which is characterized by deprivation but also confidence and affirmation of life.

In the summer of 2013 Perlmutter's work was first exhibited in Germany. FotoTV. was there and could win him for an interview.

Nick Ut

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Runtime - length of the film: 07m44s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Civil War
Korean War

Summary:

AP photographer Nick Ut went to Vietnam War when he was sixteen. In the 70's he made very impressive-oppressive pictures of the war, the fights and the bombs.

It was dangerous for photojournalists to shoot in Vietnam. By 1972 most U.S. helicopter units had left Vietnam. It had become more difficult for reporters to reach the isolated areas where South Vietnamese troops, often surrounded by communist guerrillas and regular North Vietnamese soldiers, were fighting. It was a time when AP photographers had to travel the dangerous roads leading out of Saigon, Danang or Pleiku towards areas where fighting took place. 

The most famous picture of this series is called "Napalm Girl".

In our interview Nick Ut talks about that picture, about his relationship to the meanwhile grown-up girl Kim, about his brother who died in the 60's - and about famed photographer Horst Faas who died last year.

 

Paolo Pellegrin

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Runtime - length of the film: 11m42s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Paolo Pellegrin is an Italian photojournalist and member of Magnum Photos. He spent many years in war zones of the Middle East.

Beside the local conditions, getting to the regions and gaining permission to cover situations is just as much of an issue. He went to refugee camps in Sudan and the 2006 Lebanon War, in which he witnessed death while risking his very own life.

His photograph of a dying victim won the 2006 World Press Photo Award.

Yuri Kozyrev

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Expert:
Related topics: Photojournalism | War Photography
Runtime - length of the film: 8m54s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

Photographer Yuri Kozyrev was born in Russia in 1963 and has worked as a photojournalist for the past 20 years, covering every major conflict in the former Soviet Union, including two Chechen wars. Immediately after 11 September 2001, he was on the scene in Afghanistan, where he documented the fall of the Taliban.

During this interview, Kozyrev details how he lived in Baghdad, Iraq, between 2003 and 2009, working as a contract photographer for Time. He has traveled all over Iraq, photographing the different sides of the conflict. Since the beginning of 2011, he has been following the Arab unrests, traveling in Egypt, Bahrain, Libya, and Yemen, covering the conflicts there for Time Magazine.

In 2011, Kozyrev won the Visa d'or News for his body of work: "On Revolution Road". Since February, Yuri traveled to Egypt, Bahrain, Yemen and Libya to cover the Arab revolts for Time magazine. With this prize, organized by the international festival of photojournalism Visa Pour l'Image, some of the most renowned international picture editors acknowledged the best report published between September 2010 and August 2011. He also won both Trophee and Public Prize at the Prix Bayeux-Calvados for his work "Dispatch from Libya".

 

Stanley Greene

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m41s
Language: english
Skill level:
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Summary:

In this interview photographer Stanley Greene discusses his work and career over the last 25 years, which exposed him to the births of new dawns, rising and falling empires, invasion of countries, liberations of others, mass migrations, deportations, displacements, famines, conflicts, wars and destructions. He worked on the five continents trying to document the human condition.

Greene began his art career as a painter but started taking photos as a means of cataloging material for his paintings. In 1971, when Greene was a member of the anti-war movement and the Black Panthers, his friend, photographer W. Eugene Smith offered him space in his studio and encouraged him to study photography at the School of Visual Arts in New York and the San Francisco Art Institute.

 

Horst Faas - Part 7

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Runtime - length of the film: 10m47s
Language: english
Skill level:

Summary:

In the seventh and final and possibly most meaningful installment of this special FotoTV series, historic journalist and photographer Horst Faas touches poignantly on the subject of the ethics of reporting, specifically in photojournalism.

Although many of his photos were controversial, striking scenes of torture and execution, his monumental and meaningful photos did not go without being honored as he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize.

Faas felt it was his duty to document the actual events taking place. No scene too horrific, no event too overwhelming could make him turn back. Even when it was most gruesome, he felt privileged to be there, giving information to the rest of the world hoping to touch upon their humanness, hoping to make even the slightest of difference with his photos.  

One most unforgettable story is that of the photos which brought Faas the Pulitzer Prize, the story of the torture and execution of four people who were thought to be mere students or businessmen from another ethnical group, just before Christmas in Dhaka, Bangladesh at an ordinary public political rally. One by one, the unfortunate individuals were tortured for hours at a public square right before his eyes. It was a dilemma for Faas to just photograph and not to help the individuals, but his human decency is what brought him through this harrowing experience. He was compelled to show the world this heinous act. If the torturing were not enough the individuals were then slaughtered with a bayonet, saving a direct stab in the chest for last to ensure the four died a slow and painful death.

Listening to Faas speak we know his photos were not shot in vain, because the atrocities he witnessed were seen around the world, making an incredible impact on public opinion in the United States, even changing the thinking of the then president prime minister of India, Indira Gandhi, just enough to give orders to avoid such incidents as these in the future, if even only for a week. Horst Faas's photos not only informed millions, showing what actually happened at many dangerous politically spots around the world, his photos possibly saved lives.